how to encourage young scientists

How to encourage young scientists — insights by Jane Goodall – #readilearn

In this post, I am sharing a video by Jane Goodall Sowing the Seeds of Hope.

In a previous post, I shared some insights by the ACT Scientist of the Year, climate scientist Dr Sophie Lewis. Since then, Dr Lewis has been appointed ACT Commissioner for Sustainability and the Environment. Some events that shaped Dr Lewis’s journey to becoming a scientist include:

  • Her parents took an active interest in the world and natural events, such as the passing of Halley’s Comet, and encouraged Sophie to do the same by including her in their adventures.
  • Her family spent time outdoors in the natural environment and encouraged Sophie to explore, investigate and take an interest in every aspect of the environment.
  • Sophie received gifts that encouraged and extended her ability to explore and investigate the environment; both up-close with a slide-making kit, and from a distance with a telescope.
  • In school, she extended her interest by studying science and maths.

You’ll find that the experiences of Jane Goodall reiterate the importance of parental encouragement in developing positive attitudes to science. In fact, Goodall attributes her success to her mother, who she describes as ‘extraordinary’. Goodall says that she was born with an innate love of animals and that her mother always supported and encouraged it.

One of the first books that Jane bought with her own money was Tarzan of the Apes and, at just ten years of age, she began dreaming of going to Africa to live with animals and write books about them. Although others scoffed, her mother continued to encourage her, telling her that if she really wanted something, she’d have to work hard, take advantage of all opportunities and never give up.

I’m sure, whether educating at school or at home, you will find the words of Jane Goodall as inspirational as I did.

Continue reading: How to encourage young scientists — insights by Jane Goodall – Readilearn

32 thoughts on “How to encourage young scientists — insights by Jane Goodall – #readilearn

  1. roughwighting

    Jane Goodall is a saint. Truly, I believe that. I met her once in San Francisco when she gave a talk about animals and the environment. She was mesmerizing. Her soul floated around us. I swear, she had a halo. And the line of people (mostly young women) waiting to shake her hand and gaze into her eyes at the end of her talk was illuminating. This woman is a godsend, and may we all listen to her pleas that we take better care of this Earth.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      I haven’t met her im person but her spirit speaks from the video too. What a wonderful experience it would have been to meet her in person. She is as wise as mother nature and we would do well to take heed.

      Liked by 1 person

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  2. Erica/Erika

    Norah, I find the events that shaped Dr. Lewis as a child very interesting. Like you say, the importance of the family’s encouragement.

    I listen to podcasts infrequently with the quarantine. I am enjoying this one and I am about half way through a podcast where Dr. Jane Goodall is interviewed by Tim Ferriss. Very interesting.

    Earthworms in bed………ewwww. The egg story, fascinating, especially when she was only four years old. The video is compelling, inspirational and beautiful. Thank you for sharing, Norah!

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      I am so pleased you enjoyed the video with Jane Goodall as much as I did, Erica. I have also listened to that longer one with Tim Ferriss. What a delightful interview. She seems very warm and he interviews her so well. Your response to the earthworms and chicken is similar to mine.
      You know, what I think I love most about this is that it’s the exact opposite to the way my explorations were treated and how I wish they had been. I tried to encourage my children in all their discoveries about the world. It was definitely worthwhile.

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      1. Miriam Hurdle

        We need to nurture all kinds of future professionals and specialists in the world. I read that more than 20% of the doctors in the US are Indian and if they all went back to India, we would be in trouble.

        Liked by 1 person

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        1. Norah Post author

          I love our multicultural countries. My doctor, dentist and hairdresser were all born overseas but studied here and are now permanent residents. I am pleased they chose Australia for their home.

          Liked by 1 person

          Reply
          1. Miriam Hurdle

            I think back in long time ago when Australia was not too populated, it welcome immigration. Before Britain returned Hong Kong to China in 1997, people such as my family were offered to immigrate to Australia or Britain. I had heard of other opportunities for people to immigrate to Australia also. Perhaps it was during those days that Australia became a multicultural country.

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  3. Jules

    I always encouraged my sons and grands to explore…
    While not exactly a ‘camper’ I did get them involved (my own that is) in places that introduced them to out door (not glamping) camping. 😀

    Before lockdown here the grands mom took them most Tuesdays to an open air market that had a stall featuring a ‘Bug Guy’ naturalist who as they tell it loves engaging young curious minds!

    Liked by 2 people

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