interview-with-dimity-powell-author-of-at-the-end-of-holyrood-lane-

Interview with Dimity Powell author of At the End of Holyrood Lane – Readilearn

This week I am delighted to share an interview with award-winning children’s author Dimity Powell. I previously introduced Dimity to you in her popular guest post Libraries: A wonderous universe to explore.

Dimity likes to fill every spare moment with words. She writes and reviews stories exclusively for kids and is the Managing Editor for Kids’ Book Review. Her word webs appear in anthologies, school magazines, junior novels, as creative digital content, and picture books including The Fix-It Man (2017) and At The End of Holyrood Lane (2018) with more to follow in 2019 and 2020.

She is a seasoned presenter both in Australia and overseas, an accredited Write Like An Author facilitator and a Books in Homes Role Model Volunteer in Australia.

Dimity believes picture books are soul food, to be consumed at least 10 times a week. If these aren’t available, she’ll settle for ice-cream. She lives just around the corner from Bat Man on the Gold Coast although she still prefers hanging out in libraries than with superheroes.

In this post, Dimity discusses her latest picture book At the End of Holyrood Lane. The book, illustrated by Nicky Johnston and published by EK Books, deals sensitively with the tough issue of domestic violence.

The story

At The End of Holyrood Lane is a poignant yet uplifting picture book that deals with domestic violence in a way that provides understanding and offers hope to young children.

‘At the End of Holyrood Lane is enigmatic. Different children will be able to interpret the story in different ways. I think this is excellent. Kudos to both author and illustrator for a successful creation that I hope will enrich many children’s lives.’ Susan Stephenson, The Book Chook.

The interview

Welcome to readilearn, Dimity.

Thank you for inviting me.

Dimity, At the End of Holyrood Lane was written for a very special purpose and a very special situation. Can you tell us a little about how you came to write this story and why it was important to you to do so?

Continue reading: readilearn: Interview with Dimity Powell author of At the End of Holyrood Lane – Readilearn

53 thoughts on “Interview with Dimity Powell author of At the End of Holyrood Lane – Readilearn

  1. Annecdotist

    What an important book! It’s so difficult to reach out to children living in abusive households or otherwise weathering the storm, or to do so in a way that makes it safe for them to acknowledge it. I wonder if there’s anything also for child carers with responsibility for a parent’s well-being they should never have to bear.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Your suggestion/thought is a good one, Anne. Dimity’s book is very effective in providing an avenue for discussion with children. I’m not aware of anything similar for carers, but there may be.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  2. Christy B

    I love that comment about consuming picture books first and if they’re not available then ice cream is a substitute 😉 I found ice cream bars in the freezer the other day and let’s just say this household was happy!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  3. Patricia Tilton

    I have this book in my TBR pile. It was nice to read your thoughts and interview with Dimity Powell. Domestic violence is such an important issue and I like how it has many interpretations! Congratulations to Dimity! I will be reviewing your book.

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I’m so pleased you have this book in your TBR pile, Patricia, and that you plan on reviewing it. I thought it was perfect for your blog. I look forward to reading your review. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  4. Miriam Hurdle

    I enjoyed reading the interview, Norah and Dimity. Yes, not many children’s book address the issue of domestic violence, especially in a way the children could understand. Using the storm as a metaphor is a brilliant way of doing it. Yes, other children benefit from reading it to gain understanding of the issue. Thank you for the interview.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Dimity Powell

      You are very welcome, Miriam. I appreciate your appreciation of this story and how we, Nicky the illustrator and I, attempted to portray it. It’s a tough topic to talk about however writing and sharing this book with others has definitely helped remove some of the stigma and barriers for discussion around DV, especially with children.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
      1. Miriam Hurdle

        Yes, Dimity. Illustration is so valuable in teaching children. It’s not easy to teach any abstract ideas couple with complications. Visual helps along with teaching from known to unknown. Very well done, Dimity!

        Liked by 2 people

        Reply
          1. Miriam Hurdle

            Yes. I published four children’s book when I worked for a literature organization in Hong Kong. I recruited my own illustrator who wrote notes to me when we worked for another organization, and he also drew some animation on it. I don’t have copyright of the books because it was part of my job. ❤

            Liked by 1 person

            Reply
      2. Norah Post author

        It is only when these painful situations are acknowledged and discussed that changes can occur. That ‘At the End of Holyrood Lane’ provides an avenue for those discussions is something to be proud of, Dimity. ❤

        Like

        Reply
    1. Dimity Powell

      Yes, Jacqui! Nicky Johnston – the illustrator is brilliant. Her interpretation of my text defies belief. She just seems to ‘get’ my intentions. Her illustrations add a whole other dimension, which I adore. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

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