Tag Archives: Flash fiction

the Tuffest Ride Carrot Ranch flash fiction challenge

The TUFFest Ride Third Challenge

Week #3 of the TUFF challenge begins. Are you following along at home? Charli shares progress of the Fab Five’s writing and explains the process using examples by CalmKate.

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

TUFF (The Ultimate Flash Fiction) could be thought of as a tool. I think of it as a revision process, one that teaches writers through experiencing each task. The TUFFest Ride is a contest by which the Fab Flash Five — Ritu Bhathal, Bill Engleson, Kay Kingsley, Pete Fanning, and Liz Husebye Hartmann — are competing for first, second and third place rankings. They are the five winners selected from 118 entries submitted to five Free-Writes in September. We have other dedicated writers following along, playing from the “safety of home.”

It’s not that TUFF  endangers writers, but the writing process itself feels vulnerable. We can’t teach writing from that place of instinct and imagination without risking the emotion and doubt that lingers within each of us. Editing is crisp, it is clear and known. Editing is teachable, knowable, less risky. But TUFF asks us to shed the safety of…

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The TUFFest write week 2 challenge from The Carrot Ranch

The TUFFest Ride Second Challenge

Are you riding along with the TUFFest writing challenge at home? Charli has posted the second challenge. We’re not only staying muddy for another week, we’re calling others in too! Check it out over at the Ranch.

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

Welcome back to the TUFFest Ride where five writers — Ritu Bhathal, Bill Engleson, Pete Fanning, Liz Husebye Hartmann, and Kay Kingsley — exhibit their flash fiction riding skills in The Ultimate Flash Fiction. TUFF is a process of drafting, revising, and rewriting a single story by varying word counts.

The TUFFest Ride also includes unexpected technical challenges. Like POV. All authors write their stories from a point of view (POV). It is the position the narrator takes in telling the story. Here’s a simple breakdown, although it is not a simple technique to master:

  1. First person POV: the character tells his or her own story, relating the experiences as they happen. Narration uses the pronoun “I.”
  2. Second person POV: narrates the experiences of the reader as “you” in non-fiction. Not to say it can’t be used in literary art or fiction; it’s just not common.
  3. Third person POV: the…

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Hugh's Views and News by Hugh W. Roberts

49 Days In 1988: Week 38 – Mixed Emotions

I am honoured to be featured as a guest on Hugh Roberts’ blog this week as part of his ’49 Days in 1988′ series. If you haven’t yet popped over to meet Hugh on his blog Hugh’s Views and News, please do so soon. As well as writing entertaining and often surprising stories, he is generous with his support of bloggers. Thank you for inviting me over to your place, Hugh.

Hugh's Views & News

Click here to read the first week of this feature, and follow the links at the end of each post.

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London – September 25th, 1988

The move went well today. This morning I felt very excited about moving in with Simon and Rod. The house is perfect, even if a little far out from the centre of London. 

It took us all day to sort the house out. I’d never have believed that three guys could have so many possessions. By 7pm, we had the house looking exactly as we wanted. I was lucky in that I drew the long straw and got the first choice of which bedroom I wanted. Of course, I chose the biggest.

However, what a big mistake I made by coming back to Grassmere Road this evening. I know it was only to say goodbye to the other housemates still here, but it’s not…

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the TUFFest ride flash fiction challenge

Let’s Get TUFF and Rodeo!

Finalists for the TUFFest Ride have been chosen. Are you included?

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

You can expect spills and thrills at the Rodeo. At last, we launch, late due to multiple technical difficulties following an extraordinarily long day at the Minneapolis VA Polytrauma Center. In the end, a Rough Writer drove all the way from Nebraska to feed me tonight after a day of unintentional fasting. I feasted on kale and sweet potato curry with bok choy and cauliflower rice with C. Jai Ferry (of TwitterFlash and grit lit fame).

Forgive the lateness of this post and the lack of video. My recorder died, and I can not figure out an elegant solution to videotaping on my laptop while also reading the winning entries. And I know that’s what you are all chomping at the bit to learn. I just figured out wi-fi connection at the Fisher House where I’m staying.

First, let me say this was the hardest contest I’ve ever had the…

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All You Need to Know to Rodeo

Are you saddled up ready to write in the Carrot Ranch Flash Fiction Rodeo 2018? The contests get underway this week and continue throughout October with plenty of opportunities to join in and the chance of winning a prize.
Who will be among the TUFF 5 writers? Did you enter? Could one be you.? Or maybe me? Charli reveals all on 1 October. Not long to wait!

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

Weekly Flash Fiction Challenges are on hiatus until November 1. Just like hands on a ranch, we’re going to take a break from our regular chores to challenge and show off our skills. We’re going to have us a rodeo! A flash fiction rodeo.

THE TUFFEST RIDE

Judging for TUFF began after the final September Free-Write. These writers were in it to win it. A free-write is a scary contest to enter because it makes a writer feel vulnerable, but vulnerability is exactly what a writer has to push past to write deep, to meet the muse, to follow gut instinct. Drafting is all about trusting the spark of creativity.

We will post a video on October 1 (right here in the blog feed) to announce the five writers who will advance to compete every Monday. They will write a new story to a fresh prompt, then each week revise…

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celebrating diversity in a multi-cultural classroom: a parade of nations

A parade of nations in a multicultural classroom

A parade of nations flash fiction prompt by Charli Mills at the Carrot Ranch

This week at the Carrot Ranch, Charli Mills has challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about a parade of nations. It can be literal, or it can be a phrase that you use to describe a situation. Explore what it could be. Go where the prompt leads.

One need look no further than a classroom of children to find a parade of nations. Below is my response to Charli’s prompt, but please read on for information about Multicultural Children’s Book Day, International Day of Peace, and suggestions of books to read.

A parade of nations

The children listened intently, eager to learn. Each family’s wish was for a better life. The group was a parade of nations; with Dragos from Serbia, Duy from Vietnam, Melino from Tonga, Ervine from Scotland, Rongo from New Zealand, Jung from Korea, Sanhitha from Sri Lanka, and Jawara from Senegal; and these were only the new arrivals. Others were first and second generation with but a few who could count back further than three, except for Kinta whose ancestors were the first to arrive. The wall map, dotted with pins to show each one’s heritage, was their proudest display.

While I have taught classes with children from each of these countries, and many more, for the purpose of my story I used the Baby Name Finder at Mom Junction to locate names with friendly, peaceful meanings. It is a very helpful resource.

family traditions and celebrations a unit of work for the first three years of school

It was my experience in such multi-cultural classrooms that prompted me to make a resource to facilitate learning about our own and each other’s cultural traditions and celebrations. The resource is now available on readilearn.

Multicultural Children's Book Day

Used courtesy of Multicultural Children’s Book Day

Thinking about the diversity that exists in our classrooms, our cities, our countries and our world is a perfect time to bring to your awareness Multicultural Children’s Book Day, the focus of which is on “bringing attention to all of the amazing children’s books available that celebrate diversity.”

The co-creators of the event Valarie Budayr and Mia Wenjen define multicultural books as those that

  • include characters of colour or that represent a minority point of view
  • share ideas, stories, and information about cultures, race, religion, language, and traditions
  • embrace our world and offer children new ways to connect to a diverse and richer world.

On the Multicultural Children’s Book Day website, teachers can find a collection of helpful resources; including a classroom kindness kit and a classroom empathy kit. Authors and publishers of multicultural books are also invited to sponsor Multicultural Children’s Book Day through a range of sponsorship options already open for 2019. Interest in the day has increased in the six years since its inception and that growth can only continue. While it is wonderful to see the greater number of books with multicultural and diverse themes now available, more are still needed.

Whoever You Are Mem Fox

One of my long-time favourites is Whoever You Are written by Mem Fox and illustrated by Leslie Staub. I have read it to many groups of children, every one of whom has loved its powerful message: that underneath it all, we are just the same.

You can read about, listen to Mem read, or purchase the book here.

I'm Australian Too a picture book by Mem Fox

A newer favourite is another by Mem FoxI’m Australian Too. This one is illustrated by Ronojoy Ghosh.

This book is a celebration of all cultures and heritages that are represented in the Australian population and together make our country what it is.

You can read about, listen to Mem read, or purchase the book here.

All are Welcome, a picture book by Alexandra Penfold and Suzanne Kaufman

An even newer favourite is All are Welcome written by Alexandra Penfold and illustrated by Suzanne Kaufman.

I first heard about this book from the wonderful Patricia Tilton who blogs at Children’s Books Heal. Patricia’s aim with her blog is to “share books on a wide range of topics that have a healing impact on children who are facing challenges in their lives.” I have purchased many lovely books recommended by Patricia and never been disappointed.

Just as I was completing a draft of this post, I received notification of a new post by Patricia. You won’t believe it, but Patricia wrote about the book again for the International Day of Peace on 21 September. How perfect. Please pop over to Patricia’s post for more details about this beautiful book.

Once, long ago, there used to be a recording of Bill Martin Jr. singing I am Freedom’s Child on his website. I loved singing along to it with my class. The words were especially meaningful in our multicultural classes. We sang, “As I learn to like the differences in me, I learn to like the differences in you.” What a wonderful thought that, with acceptance of ourselves, comes acceptance of others. If we could just do that, we would indeed, all be freedom’s children.

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

Fractured Fairy Tales Contest for the Carrot Ranch Rodeo

Once Upon a Rodeo Time

As promised, here’s some information to start your thinking in preparation for the fractured fairy tale flash fiction contest in the Carrot Ranch Rodeo next month. (Try saying that five times real fast!)

Please note: The correct date is Oct 24, not Oct 17 as shown below.

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

From the remote reaches of northern Idaho, the Carrot Ranch Weekly Challenges launched in March of 2014. From around the world, Norah Colvin accepted the first challenge from Australia. She’s held a special place at the Ranch ever since.

Norah cultivates the kind of growth mindset that marks a life-long learner. But she’s also a teacher. Norah frames her entries in posts that focus on education, giving her readers new points of learning or discussion. Last year she launched readilearn (a sponsor of the 2018 Flash Fiction Rodeo, so be sure to check out the site).

You can always expect to learn something new from Norah, and her Rodeo Contests is no exception.

INTRO

Rodeo #4 Fractured Fairy Tales
By Norah Colvin

Do you love fairy tales? Chances are, unless you are a parent or grandparent of young children or an early childhood educator as I am, you may not…

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