Emma Middleton author and illustrator discusses the importance of illustrations in children's picture books

The importance of illustrations in picture books – a guest post by Emma Middleton – Readilearn

This week I have great pleasure in introducing you to Emma Middleton who is here to discuss illustrations in picture books as tools for analysis, enjoyment and interpretation.

Emma is a picture book author, illustrator, children’s performer and former ballerina who lives near Noosa, Queensland. After a career in performing arts, during which time she danced for the Vienna Ballet, she returned to Australia to direct and teach at The Brighton Dance Academy.

Emma retired from teaching dance to follow her passion for picture books by creating stories that will enhance a child’s sense of wonder, delight and unlimited possibility. Emma is the author of companion picture books The Lion in our Living Room and The Bear in our Backyard.

Welcome to readilearn, Emma. Over to you.

Illustrations in picture books can be an excellent tool for developing children’s analytical and interpretative skills, as well as enhancing their enjoyment of art. Picture book advocate Megan Daley says, ‘Picture books are works of art which should adorn the walls of art galleries and libraries.’

For young children, illustrated books open the door to understanding story. Illustrations provide young readers with an immediate vision of the characters, setting, and mood of the story. Children instantly respond to characters from their visual appeal. We all know and love many picture book characters from their image alone.

Emma Middleton discusses the importance of illustrations in children's picture books, including Peter Rabbit

 

Continue reading: The importance of illustrations in picture books – a guest post by Emma Middleton – Readilearn

35 thoughts on “The importance of illustrations in picture books – a guest post by Emma Middleton – Readilearn

    1. Norah Post author

      Yes, that’s wonderful too, and great for language development. Before they’re reading for themselves, you can also encourage them to make up their own version of the story told in pictures.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Jules

        When my grands were younger I’d have them draw, then tell me about their pictures. I’d write/print the sentences (senseless or not…on the pages). Made several booklets for Mommy and Daddy that way. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
          1. Jules

            I just found a wonderful book from the library that my Little Miss can read all by herself…and she has done so several times this morning already 🙂
            by Kate DiCamillo called “La La La”
            ISBN 978-0-7636-5833-5
            The only word in the book is La. Maybe today I can get her to make her own ‘La’ book? 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

            Reply
              1. Jules

                I actually thought Little Miss had sort of at least read other books. But apparently Little Miss who was very excited – told Mommy all about how she did read her first book all by herself at Grama’s. And the only word was LA. Mommy had to pick up something yesterday eve – so I showed her the book. I may just have to get Little Miss that book for a birthday or holiday present 😉

                Liked by 1 person

                Reply
                  1. Norah Post author

                    Such a lovely thing to do together. When my granddaughter comes over, she always asks if we can make a book on the computer. Well, of course, my dear child. Why not?

                    Liked by 1 person

                    Reply
                1. Norah Post author

                  So cute. And what a lovely first reading memory for Little Miss to have. I’m sure she’ll treasure whatever book you give her. Enjoy these precious times.

                  Liked by 1 person

                  Reply
      1. Jennie

        You’re welcome, Norah. BTW, I have been invited to the home of E.B. White’s great niece. She has heard of my reading aloud Charlotte’s Web to children over the years. Isn’t that exciting? 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
          1. Jennie

            I know! She spoke at our public library last month, but I was out of town. Our librarian told her about me, and she would like to meet me. I feel like a child at Christmas! I’ll let you know all about it. 🙂

            Like

            Reply
          1. Miriam Hurdle

            Yes, Norah. She knows which book makes crunchy sound and which toy animal would squeak when she bends the body. It’s so fun to watch her play. I could see that her mind keeps going. How wonderful is the early childhood development!! 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

            Reply
  1. Pingback: The importance of illustrations in picture books – a guest post by Emma Middleton – Readilearn – The Militant Negro™

I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.