readilearn: The significance of the Chinese New Year – a guest post by Mabel Kwong

Chinese New Year is an important Chinese festival celebrated around the world, not only in Asian countries, but in many countries where there is a large population of Chinese people or their descendants, including Australia. Maybe it is celebrated where you are too.

This week I have the great pleasure of introducing you to Mabel Kwong, a writer and Chinese Australian. Mabel explores and writes about the topics of multiculturalism, cultural diversity and identities. She feels that the more you get to know others of different backgrounds and each other’s cultures, the more you learn to see things from different perspectives. In her spare time, she is a keen photographer and video gamer.

In this post Mabel shares with us some background information about the Chinese New Year as well as her personal experience of Chinese New Year celebrations when she was growing up in Malaysia and Singapore.

Chinese New Year celebrations in the classroom

Mabel has written the post in such a way that it could be read to a class of children. Indeed, we have worked together to prepare it as such, and it is now available as an estory, free to everyoneβ€”there is no need even to registerβ€”in Chinese New Year Cultural Studies resources.

Continue reading: readilearn: The significance of the Chinese New Year – a guest post by Mabel Kwong

26 thoughts on “readilearn: The significance of the Chinese New Year – a guest post by Mabel Kwong

  1. Mabel Kwong

    It was such a pleasure collaborating with you, Norah, and readilearn. Thank you for the opportunity once again. As I mentioned over at readliearn, some have chimed into the conversation and it is great to hear their perspectives on the Chinese New Year too. Such an important occasion and we need to learn more about it, recognise it. It is heartening to see how Australia gets into the Chinese New Year spirit each year. This is especially so in Melbourne where there are month-long celebrations in both city and suburban areas where the proportion of those Asian background are high πŸ™‚

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you once again for sharing so generously, Mabel. Chinese New Year is such a fun celebration for us all to join in, it is helpful to understand the traditions a little better. Wishing you a wonderful celebration and a very Happy Chinese New Year!

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  2. Sherri Matthews

    Hi Norah, so lovely to be here again. I am trying to make somewhat of a comeback to blogging while working on my memoir, and I have missed your posts very much. I so much enjoyed Mabel’s guest post and commented over at Readilearn, but my comment disappeared 😦 I hope it shows up and you find it.. A wonderful learning resource and great to see you both again πŸ™‚

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    1. Norah Post author

      Hi Sherri, It’s lovely to see you here again. I am looking forward to reading your memoir though, so I hope you’re not spending too much time away from it. πŸ™‚
      I’m so pleased you enjoyed Mabel’s post and thank you for reading and leaving a comment at readilearn. Your comment didn’t disappear – it was just waiting for me to approve since it was your first time commenting there. πŸ™‚ All sorted now. Thanks for your patience.

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      1. Sherri Matthews

        Aww…thanks so much for your interest Norah! I am indeed hitting the memoir hard, but also wanting to try to keep better connected blog wise, albeit in short bursts! Don’t worry, the memoir is my priority, I am determined to finish it! Thanks for letting me know my comment didn’t disappear, phew! I had fears of being locked in spam prison again! I enjoyed Mabel’s post very much. Lovely to see you both collaberating together πŸ™‚

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  3. reocochran

    This collaboration was well worth the time since many will be inspired to carry out Chinese New Year celebrations with their families, children and students. I always liked making Chinese lanterns with my preschoolers who were an integrated group of age 3-6 year olds with typically developing and developmental delays. They would color, fringe edges with safety scissors and hole punches. My teacher assistant and I would roll these colored construction paper creations into the tubes and attach strings to hand in the room! Asian foods were brought in to share, being careful of allergies. . . πŸŽ‰πŸŽˆπŸŽ† Fun ensued!
    Hi to Mabel! ✨

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    1. Norah Post author

      Robin, thank you for sharing your experiences. I thoroughly enjoyed collaborating with Mabel. I learned so much and she was extremely patient with me and generous with her time. Your celebrations with your preschoolers sound fun. I’m sure they had a wonderful time and learned a lot about caring for and respecting each other.

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      1. reocochran

        You’re so welcome! It was so nice of you to “listen.” 😊
        Oh, I am so happy I saved a few photos of those wonderful nine years, Norah.
        The very best years of my life were as a single Mom babysitting five children, plus my own three for also nine years. The ability to make all ends meet and not go hungry was an amazing experience on my “own.” Meaning my kids couldn’t help pay the bills but I was able to without going on public assistance. I’m so happy I also paid taxes and into our social security program.

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        1. Norah Post author

          Those years are so precious, aren’t they? I’m pleased you enjoyed them too, Robin. What fun you and the children would have had. It’s great to have the photos. Sometimes the photos are the only memories we have. I like your sentiment about independent living. πŸ™‚

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Patricia. I’m pleased you enjoyed the post. I enjoyed collaborating with Mabel to write it. While not a book, the resource is available for anyone to read online. πŸ™‚

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  4. thecontentedcrafter

    That’s a great article Norah and Mabel! It is wonderful to have an authentic voice sharing experiences and meanings. And the resources you are offering on Readilearn look very intriguing and exciting Norah. I now live in a city that has a long Chinese heritage, dating back to the gold rush. When I arrived here fifteen years ago we had a NZ-Chinese Mayor who did a lot to encourage multi-culturalism. He was responsible for nurturing a sister city programme and instigated and oversaw the construction of a genuine Chinese Garden in the city. This city, like many in NZ celebrates Chinese New Year with all the trimmings! I’m absolutely certain that when young children are encouraged to play with each other and experience different cultures in these ways barriers never get a chance to rise.

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    1. Norah Post author

      I’m so pleased you enjoyed the post, Pauline. Mabel and I spent many long hours collaborating on this one. I really appreciate her generosity. As you say, her voice provide authenticity. How wonderful to have a mayor who did so much to promote multiculturalism. I think sharing celebrations is a great way to start finding out about and appreciating each other. How lovely to have a genuine Chinese Garden in your city. They are wonderful places of peace. There is a big one in Sydney which is very beautiful. And of course I agree with you about the importance of play for developing intercultural understanding.

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