establishing a supportive classroom environment from the first day of school in early childhood classrooms

readilearn: Establishing a supportive classroom environment from day one – Readilearn

Establishing a supportive classroom environment from day one builds a strong foundation of positive relationships and attitudes to school and learning. It is important to begin the year as you wish it to continue, and a welcoming classroom helps children and families feel valued. Having an organised classroom is just a part of it.

Many existing readilearn resources support the establishment of a supportive classroom environment.

The free resource Getting ready for the first day with Busy Bee resources lists some of the available resources and suggestions for using them; including:

busy Bees welcome to first day of school package

These resources are available to download individually, or as a collection in the zip folder Busy Bee – Welcome resources for Day one.

In many of the schools in which I have worked, children are expected to bring their own set of supplies – books, pencils, scissors, glue, paint shirts, even tissues. I recognise that not all schools have this requirement, so ignore any suggestions that are not relevant to your situation.

Whether children are required to bring their own supplies or not, it is useful to have spares

Source: readilearn: Establishing a supportive classroom environment from day one – Readilearn

20 thoughts on “readilearn: Establishing a supportive classroom environment from day one – Readilearn

  1. Mabel Kwong

    It is such an interesting initiative you proposed, and readilearn is also such an informative blog with so many suggestions on making the classroom such a supportive environment. True, some schools provide supplies, some don’t. I guess with schools that don’t, as you mentioned the children can bring their own or they can share supplies all round or the school can come up with creative ways to accommodate 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Great suggestions there, Mabel. Thank you.
      When I was teaching in the 80s, the department supplied exercise books and pencils for children to use. It was wonderful. It would probably surprise most people how much teachers supply from their own pocket.

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  2. reocochran

    Developing rapport with parents is so valuable and sending home class activity summaries helped my (class) parents to expand lessons or send in something which was applicable to the lessons. . .
    Spare supplies is a kind thing to provide without comment. I never requested extras or followed up with embarrassing requests to students or parents.
    You have such a lovely calm presence, Norah. This builds bridges from class to home and back! 💕 📚

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      It sounds like we have a lot in common in the ways we support students and involve parents, Robin. It’s great to meet another like-minded teacher. 🙂

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Pam. I was fortunate to have the privilege of walking alongside so many little ones, sharing their learning journeys. What could be more fun than spending the day with six-year-olds?
      Sadly, it hasn’t cooled down at all. Saw on the news tonight that 2017 was the hottest year ever for Queensland. Hub says, it’s summer, what do you expect?

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. Christy B

    It’s great that you included a section on encouraging children to reflect on the projects they did in the classroom when they get home. I always liked talking about my creations with my parents 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I think that discussion is so important, Christy, and it’s useful for parents to ask insightful questions. If they simply ask, “What did you do today?” many children will shrug and respond, “Nothing”.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks, Robin. I’d so love to be preparing these things for a class again too. (I’m not sure if you’d fit in the desks though. 🙂 )

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