Welcome to spring!

Responses to a previous post on the importance of feedback suggested that I trial republishing readilearn posts here.  As the suggestion came from a number of people I considered it sound advice and worth trying. As always, I will be interested to hear what you think.

This post is republished from the readilearn blog.

© Norah Colvin

© Norah Colvin

The first day of September marks the first day of spring in Australia. It is also recognised throughout Australia as Wattle Day.  The golden wattle is our national floral emblem. Its colours give the recognisable green and gold to our sporting teams.

Like the people of our land, it is a plant that shows both diversity and resilience. There are hundreds of species of wattle growing in many different habitats across Australia.  They may be seen growing wild in bush areas and national parks, and cultivated in botanic gardens, on footpaths and in home gardens.

© Bec Colvin

© Bec Colvin

I have three varieties of wattle growing in my garden. Last year, when the plants were one-year-old, they flowered abundantly and were home to ladybirds. It was wonderful to watch each stage of the ladybird’s growth, from egg to adult. This year, the trees were more heavily laden with blossoms, but there were no ladybirds. I was disappointed as I was looking forward to seeing the ladybirds again. However, it has been suggested that the absence of ladybirds may indicate the tree is healthier this year. I don’t know.

In Australia we generally refer to seasons as occurring in particular months:

Spring in September, October, and November

Summer in December, January, and February

Autumn in March, April, and May

Winter in June, July, and August.

However, it is not as simple as that.  Australia is a land of extremes, with different climate zones and types of weather experienced across the country. It can be cooler in the summers of southern areas than it is the months called winter in the north. For example, the average January (summer) daytime temperature in Hobart is 21.7⁰C, and the average July (winter) daytime temperature for Darwin is 30.5⁰C.

Spring is a great time for exploring the garden and it’s inhabitants. What is spring like where you are?

Getting to know readilearn resources

Also coinciding with the beginning of spring is the Australian Father’s Day, celebrated on the first Sunday in September. It is a day not just for dads, but for grandfathers, stepfathers, and other male carers and role models. It is a day to let them know how much they are appreciated.

 

how to make a book cover - cover

One great way of providing children with a purpose and targeted audience for writing is to get them to make a book for their father figure. I have provided some ideas to get the writing started in the resource How to make a book cover. The resource itself provides step by step instructions for making a cover for a book using complementary colours. The instructions can be displayed on the white board for children to read and follow.

Suggestions for writing include:

  • A list of statements about their Dad e.g. My Dad goes to work. My Dad makes my breakfast. My Dad has curly hair and a bushy beard. Children write and illustrate one statement on each page.
  • A recount or memoir about a favourite holiday or activity they do with their Dad.
  • A series of things about fathers e.g. Some fathers ride motorbikes. Some fathers ride horses. Children finish with a statement about their own dads, for example; But my father rides a skateboard.
  • A list of things that Dad likes, one to each page.

Five Fabulous books to read for Father’s Day

2015-09-19 10.52.00

Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney, illustrated by Anita Jeram

My Dad

My Dad by Anthony Browne

going on a bear hunt

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen, illustrated by Helen Oxenbury

Just Me and My Dad

Just Me and My Dad by Mercer Mayer

2015-09-19 10.54.00

Hey, I Love You by Ian Whybrow, illustrated by Rosie Reeve

Of course, there are many more too.

The Ice Cream Shop - estory

The readilearn estory The Ice Cream Shop also features an outing with Dad. However, before reading it with your children, decide if you wish to use the interactive covered cloze version with them.  If desired, for most effective teaching and learning, the covered cloze should be used prior to any other familiarisation with the story. (You can find information about covered cloze as a teaching strategy here.)

Please contact me if you have any questions. I welcome your feedback, especially suggestions for improvements to existing resources or ideas for new ones.

Remember to use your coupon codes at the checkout to activate your discount. If you can’t see where to enter the coupon code, select “View basket“.

ncblog firstin2

 

Thank you

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

 

 

24 thoughts on “Welcome to spring!

  1. Charli Mills

    Happy Spring, Norah! Climate seems independent in Australia, as in it season and region decides to do its own thing. And do wish the male carers in your life a Happy Father’s Day. I’m glad you are posting these readilearn segments here because I enjoy reading despite not being your target audience. Of course, as part of your community, it also makes me think of who I do know who is your target audience. It’s my own share challenge! And I realized — you’ve actually published several e-stories (aka digital children’s books). You are an author! 🙂 Congratulations on launching what has been a hug volume of work to set up!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Charli. Happy Fall to you! And thanks for your Father’s Day wishes. I see it was celebrated over there in June. I hope your menfolk enjoyed the day too.
      Thanks for your encouragement with readilearn. It has been, and will continue to be, a huge undertaking. But it’s fun. I love doing it. If it can help others as well, that will be wonderful. If not, well, I’ve had fun! 🙂 Thank you for thinking about who your can share with. I very much appreciate your support.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Charli Mills

        readilearn reminds me of a writer or artist’s professional portfolio. It’s like a showcase of all your knowledge and experience in early childhood education. That you are sharing it with other educators is a gift.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
  2. Sacha Black

    I did a double take at first – having completely forgotten that Australia’s seasons are the opposite to ours. I can’t really get my head around that! But I am looking forward to seeing lots of your readilearn posts here 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. macjam47

    Norah, your seasons are much like ours but opposite. I’m looking forward to fall which starts in late September and ends just before Christmas. Most people typically consider equate the start of fall with the day after Labor Day (the first Monday in September) because children are back in school, pools are closed, stores have Halloween and fall decorations out. I love the change of seasons!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      It is interesting that we are opposites. We don’t really have fall in the part of Australia in which I live. The trees tend to be evergreen. We don’t have fall decorations. What do they consist of?

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. macjam47

        Usually pumpkins, gourds, fall leaves, berries arranged into wreaths, centerpieces, and such. Then for Halloween, I add a few ghosts, jack-o-lanterns, witches. In November after I have removed the Halloween items, I add items for Thanksgiving – pilgrims and American Indians, cornucopia to represent the 1st Thanksgiving. Fall decorations are very versatile, because you decorate once and just add a few items for the fall holidays.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Geoff. I very much appreciate your comment.
      Thanks for the reminder of that hilarious sketch. It would be a nice short national anthem! Wouldn’t last long for the athletes on the podium though. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  4. Annecdotist

    I think I’m going to enjoy these posts, even though I can’t make use of your materials. The site looks brilliant, and I hope lots of people sign up.
    I just wondered, will your target demographic know the meaning of “covered cloze”? I didn’t, so follow the link expecting a definition but couldn’t find one.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Hi Anne, Thank you for your encouragement. I hope I can maintain the interest. It’s funny though, I hadn’t intended to post again until next Friday. Then I thought about the beginning of spring and Father’s Day, and realised next week would be too late. I hadn’t planned on writing about them, but went ahead and did it anyway. We’ll see what next week brings. 🙂
      Hopefully teachers will be aware of using covered cloze as a teaching strategy. If not I have provided information with the resource, which is linked to. Perhaps I should have linked to the information as well. Will do that now. Thanks. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  5. thecontentedcrafter

    Yes Norah, I start to wonder if your site might also be of benefit to immigrant Australian parents too. It is beautifully written, presented and full of little snippets. If I had young kids I think I’d be checking in regularly for all kinds of helpful information. I had a wattle in my last garden and the tuis loved it!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Pauline. I appreciate your encouragement. I do hope people find readilearn useful.
      I didn’t know what tuis are, so had to look them up. How wonderful to have such beautiful birds visit your garden! Thank you for teaching me something new. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

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