Writer in Residence

This week at the Carrot Ranch, Charli Mills challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story about a new way to office. Has the office changed? Can we return to normal after big changes or time away? Go where the prompt leads!

As a teacher who also loved to write, I used to love inspiring and nurturing a love of writing in my children. The desire equalled my love of reading and of picture books. We wrote together every day (they wrote, and I wrote at the same time). We often wrote collaboratively, authoring stories, songs, and poems together before they wrote their own. They wrote independently and of their own volition, especially in free time. I, and they, would often say, “That would make a good story.” I loved reading and responding to the messages they wrote to me in a daily diary that gave me a window into their lives and the things that were important to them.

To encourage their writing, there was always a great variety of paper, pens and other essential equipment available to them. While I didn’t ever have a desk such as I describe in my flash fiction (it is fiction, you see), I can just imagine how they would have loved it and how they would have imagined themselves at it while writing in the office (writing corner). I hope you can imagine it too.

Writer in Residence

The large old oak writer’s desk with multiple drawers, pigeon holes, an ink well and leather writing mat faced the room.

Upon it, a multitude of cups stocked with pencils, pens and other writing and drawing tools sat ready. The pigeon holes held a magnificence of paper and cardboard, and the drawers essentials like scissors, glue, rulers, lettering guides, clips and stapler. It was a writer’s paradise — perfect for the daily Writer in Residence.

The children loved it. Especially when they were Writer for the day with freedom to organise, reorganise and create to their heart’s content — growing writers.

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

35 thoughts on “Writer in Residence

  1. Susan Scott

    mmmmm, I’m thinking about a large oak writing desk that came down with furniture removals a little while ago, that belonged to my husband’s grandfather and used by my husband in his study up in our old home, which now cannot be used here and is currently languishing in the garage, Although I have my own study desk, I wonder if I can use that one – your description has got me thinking … lovely post Norah! Have a lovely weekend.

    Liked by 1 person

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  2. Pingback: New Way to Office « Carrot Ranch Literary Community

  3. calmkate

    all children should have a desk, it strongly says that study and creativity are important. I never had one and sharing the family dining table told me study was not something to be encouraged 😦

    Glady overcame that hurdle and now have a lovely one, with several other options 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      A desk like that would be amazing, wouldn’t it, Charli? A writer’s dream. It’s all one would need to write a prize-winning manuscript. I’d accept one in my office any time. Though I am very fond of my custom-built desk. Perhaps when we downsize and I can’t take this desk with me, I’ll try to find one of those to invest in. 😂

      Liked by 1 person

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  4. Patricia Tilton

    Kids would love to have a desk like that! An author friend homeschooled her kids. As part of their learning process/journey, they each wrote and learned how to design a cover, and publish a book on Amazon. Loved that!

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      And not only kids, Patricia. I’d love a desk like that. Though my desk is a pretty good one – custom build by Hub aeons ago.
      What a fabulous opportunity for those homeschooled children. We (the children) used to make books at school but to publish them on Amazon would be amazing.

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  5. D. Avery @shiftnshake

    Here you go again, Buddy! Always the educator and making me reminisce about it.
    I never had a desk either when I was in elementary school. But there was a writer’s desk and an author’s chair and we did much of what you describe. I always wrote with the children. It was a writers’ workshop. When I went to middle school and taught math(s) exclusively there was still a narrative/literary approach to that subject as I helped students decipher a math story or numerical sentence.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      That writers’ workshop is so important, isn’t it? We need to model what we want to see in the children. It’s not difficult for us to model a love of read and writing – or of maths for that matter. Maths is not just numbers. So much of it is embedded in language and context. Being able to understand the context and decipher the language is its purpose. I’m sure your children loved being taught that way – meaning makes learning fun and purposeful.

      Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      Two desks! You are so lucky. I think inspiration would come from just working at one. You’d better get them organised for writing. Not that you need inspiration. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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