developing understanding of number with three new resources

Developing understanding of number with three new resources – #readilearn

An understanding of number is crucial to navigating our complex world. It is something we use everyday whether we are aware of it or not. From things as seemingly simple as matching the number of socks to our number of feet, to scheduling our day, through to more complex activities like balancing our budget, an understanding of number and mathematics is involved.

It always saddens me when people say, ‘Oh I can’t do maths’, especially when those people are young people. I think a lot of the inability and fear was learned. I know it was for me. Perhaps that is why I am on a mission to make learning in maths enjoyable and meaningful. It doesn’t have to be fearfully abstract and complex if we build strong foundations in the early years.

There are already well over one hundred mathematics resources in the readilearn collection, and this week I have added three more. Two of the resources are interactive lessons ready to teach on the interactive whiteboard in the classroom or, for those still teaching online, via screen sharing software. The third is a printable resource. All support your teaching and are open-ended and adaptable to the needs of you and your learners.

Repeating Patterns

Let’s Make Patterns is designed for teaching and reviewing repeating patterns on the interactive whiteboard. Patterns are an important part of mathematics. Learning about patterns with objects helps children understand the patterns upon which our decimal number system is based.

Continue reading: Developing understanding of number with three new resources – readilearn

27 thoughts on “Developing understanding of number with three new resources – #readilearn

  1. Miriam Hurdle

    Wonderful resources, Norah. I loved teaching math. I had the kids count by twos, fives… etc. Before they knew it, they could do multiplication. Mercy asked Autumn, “How many… do you want?” When she just wanted to read and didn’t want to go to bed, they would say, “We’ll read two more.”

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  2. Patricia Tilton

    I didn’t like higher math as a teen, but have come to appreciate it as an adult. If you start young with kids and make it fun, it makes all the difference. Shapes and patterns can be abstract for kids. Excellent resources for kids.

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    1. Norah Post author

      I agree, Patricia. If children are given a strong foundation with understanding from the beginning, they will have no trouble seeing how it all fits together.

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  3. calmkate

    Personally I find maths quite relaxing … it’s a tool I use if my mind wants to spiral … calculating the amount of rainfall that can be caught off that particular roof or the shed or the neighbours. Earths me, it’s almost like a refuge …

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  4. petespringerauthor

    It’s frustrating enough when kids develop an attitude of “this is too hard,” but what used to get me was when parents would say, “I wasn’t any good in math either.” Does that mean we shouldn’t try to help your child? Like anything, when children have success, they feel better about themselves. The fact that you are providing helpful resources is great!

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    1. Norah Post author

      I think your question about parents who found maths hard is a good one, Pete. That’s probably even more reason we need to ensure children develop positive attitudes – to combat the negative attitudes they’ll (possibly) learn from parents.
      I believe in making learning meaningful and fun, Pete. 🙂

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  5. petespringerauthor

    It’s frustrating enough when kids develop an attitude of “this is too hard,” but what used to get me was when parents would say, “I wasn’t any good in math either.” Does that mean we shouldn’t try to help your child? Like anything, when children have success, they feel better about themselves. The fact that you are providing helpful resources is great!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Yes, it is frustrating, Pete. If parents have a negative attitude to maths, then I think it’s all the more important for teachers to inculcate a positive attitude. There’s no point in having a defeatest attitude before one even tries.

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