ideas for learning at home when you can't go out

Ideas for learning at home when you can’t go out – #readilearn

Not all learning happens in school. It has always been that way. While teachers are responsible for children’s learning of curricula, and held responsible for more than they really should be, parents have always been their children’s first and most important teachers.

It is in those years before school that children learn many of their attitudes to life and learning, develop language and, hopefully, a love of reading. It is parents who are the primary influencers in the early years. And that doesn’t change once they start school. Ask any teacher.

Now that many schools are closed and parents are required to support their children’s learning at home, many parents are feeling anxious and lacking in confidence about their ability to do so. It is understandable when, for so long, it has been the expectations that, at age five or six, parents will pass over the responsibility for their children’s academic progress to teachers.

 Parents, you’ve got this.

Parents, I say to you, for these, hopefully, few short months out of school, you’ve got this.

The most valuable things — read, talk, play

Continue reading: Ideas for learning at home when you can’t go out – readilearn

33 thoughts on “Ideas for learning at home when you can’t go out – #readilearn

  1. Mabel Kwong

    I popped over to Readilearn to read the post. It is such a helpful post on what to do with your children and learning now that everyone is at home more. So agree with you on your opening line that not all learning happens in school. Learning outside of the classroom is just as important too.

    Food preparation with your kids is a very creative idea. The children probably won’t be the cooks near a hot gas stove, but as you said, they can choose the menu and prepare the food. Giving them ingredients like fruit to count would be a good way to help their numeracy skills, as you alluded to.

    The activities you described for reading and learning make them very fun activities at home – especially with a ‘no wrong’ approach in the first instance. When you make it fun, the more children probably want to do it.

    I’d add that having a mix of both screen time and non-screen time for learning at home. Online learning is great, and so is learning offline in the real world. Both worlds also complement each other.

    Hope you are doing well, Norah 🙂

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    1. Norah Post author

      Hi Mabel, It’s so lovely to hear from you. I am very grateful for your lovely supportive comment and the additional suggestions you contributed. I didn’t explicitly state screen time so it’s good that you did. There is no getting away from screens now, it’s how they are used that’s the important thing.
      Thank you for your wishes, Mabel. I am doing well. I hope you are too. 🙂

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      1. Mabel Kwong

        That’s right. No getting away from screens now as we all study and work from home 😀 Hope we all remember to take regular breaks so we don’t get tired from too much screen time or constant screen staring. Take care 🙂

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Jacqui. I’m a big fan of putting the child at the centre of education and allowing for less formality and more flexibility too. The suggestions I share highlight the importance of learning through everyday activities – not a worksheet or check mark in sight. 🙂

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    1. Norah Post author

      I hope so too, Pauline. The ideas are easy but effective. Let’s make this less stressful than it’s seeming to be. I don’t want anyone losing hair needlessly! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      It is a difficult time for many, Kate. We need to share the load if we can. Solitude sounds perfect. You share your wisdom while keeping yourself and others safe.

      Liked by 1 person

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  2. petespringerauthor

    Early education is so crucial, and I’m so glad you provide this service, Norah. Some of my fondest memories were reading with my son. It pays off in the end; he has a master’s degree in education and is a lot smarter than me.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      How wonderful for you for your son to follow in your footsteps, Pete. I’m sure he learned a lot of his educational skills from you. The early years are crucial. That’s why I am so passionate about them.

      Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      I hope so too, D. It’s a new world for children, parents and teachers. We need to make it as much fun, least stressful and the most effective we can – for all. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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  3. Erica/Erika

    I good reminder always and especially today, Norah. I will forward this site to my daughter. She has the four and six year old girls. The Grade one teacher has been checking in regularly via zoom and with a group of children. So far, keeping it fun and hopefully no stress for everyone. I love it, “read, talk, play.” Take care. Stay well.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for you enthusiasm, Erica. And thank you for forwarding the post to your daughter. I’m sure she’ll find some suggestions she can use with her daughters. What brilliant ages. You must miss them. I’m missing my grandchildren at the moment.

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