School Days Reminiscences of Yvette Prior

School Days, Reminiscences of Yvette Prior

Welcome to the School Days, Reminiscences series in which my champion bloggers and authors share reminiscences of their school days. It’s my small way of thanking them for their support and of letting you know about their services and publications.

This week, I am pleased to introduce Yvette Prior, a blogger and multi-talented friend. Yvette writes about a wide range of topics and in a variety of genres on her priorhouse blog. I always appreciate her different ways of looking at things and her positive views of the world. Do pop over to take a look. I’m sure you will enjoy it.

It’s probably best I allow Yvette to tell you a little of herself before we get started on the interview:

Yvette Prior is a blogger, author, teacher, psychologist, and researcher. Yvette has been married to Chris for 22 years and they live on the East Coast of Virginia. They have two boys, now adults, and a step-daughter who is expecting her second child next year. Yvette has been teaching — on and off  — elementary students and college level, since the 1990s. In 2018, Yvette became a Certified Higher Education Professional and currently teaches college and works part-time as a work psychologist.

In middle school, Yvette won public speaking awards, which led to the wonderful opportunity of attending a Performing Arts High School.

In college, she changed her major a few times before finally discovering the Education department.

Right after graduating, she decided to put her career to the side in order to stay home and raise her children. While doing so, she still worked part-time, which included teaching science education and five years of teaching elementary art.

As her children grew, she had the chance to go back to school and earn advanced degrees in psychology. While finishing up her dissertation, she healed from an invasive fungal infection, which was a challenging nightmare, but then also had positive outcomes. She now has a stronger bioterrian and continues to feel empowered by knowing alternative medicine and by remembering how precious life is. She is not a religious person, but she is a woman of faith and gives God all the glory for any and every success.

Yvette Prior and books

Welcome, Yvette.

Let’s talk school. First, could you tell us where you attended school?

Buffalo, New York.

Did you attend a government, private or independent school?

Yvette Prior early school days

I started off at private for preschool and kindergarten. My mother became a Presbyterian and we withdrew from private Catholic and went to public. I went to a public “magnet” school for high school where I majored in performing arts.

What is the highest level of education you achieved? 

I earned my Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

What work or profession did you choose after school and was there anything in school that influenced this choice?

Yvette Prior working life

As noted in the intro, after earning my undergrad in Education, I stayed home with children. I worked part-time (to stay fresh and bring in some money) and at first worked in a restaurant, where I was promoted to management and it was becoming a career. However, we then moved coast to coast, twice, and I taught at the Youth Science Institute of California and the Science Museum of Virginia. I then taught elementary art at two different private schools. I currently teach college and work part-time as a psychologist. In the next few years, I hope to do more research about work rewards and motivation and also hope to finish up some writing projects. 

What is your earliest memory of school?

An early memory from school was when my 4th grade, silver-haired teacher, said she was, “flabbergasted” with me. She had left the room and a few of us started dancing around. When she returned, she scolded everyone, but then got close to my face and said, “I am especially flabbergasted with you, Yvette.” I went home and asked my mother what it meant… and then she found out about it. That word always reminds me of that teacher.

What memories do you have of learning to read? 

I remember reading stations and recall the teacher using a jumbo book and audio recording to teach us words.

What memories do you have of learning to write? 

My 6th grade English teacher, Mr. Calderelli, taught me to write. However, on the second day of school, he threw an eraser towards my desk because a few of us were still talking. I cannot recall all the details, but he apologized and I was moved to the front of the room. We then connected and he became my favorite teacher. I had perfect attendance and won little awards. He published my writing in Buffalo’s “Our Best” – a short piece arguing against the death penalty. In hindsight, I see how that eraser event could have had a different outcome, and I am grateful it was a catalyst for bonding.

I have a post on my blog dedicated to Mr. C here.

(Norah’s note: If you haven’t yet read that post, or even if you have, I recommend you visit it and have a read. It is a fine example of Yvette’s work.)

What do you remember about math classes? 

I recall Mr. Smyth, in 7th grade honors math, showing us newspaper ads and having us figure out sale prices using percentages. I sometimes think of him when I see holiday ads.

What do you remember about history classes?

Yvette Prior on quality teaching

My 8th grade teacher gave fun assignments for extra credit. Sometimes a little extra credit allows more students to “win” and attain that sense of success with a better grade. Recently, I heard a teacher brag about how “tough” she was, but I think she is missing out on what makes a great teacher. Quality teaching is not defined by toughness, or being the sage on the stage; instead, the goal is to engage diverse learners and help them effectively meet course objectives. And sometimes – a little extra credit option can breathe needed motivation into students 

What was your favourite subject?

Yvette Prior favourite subject

My favorite subject was Trigonometry in high school. I started off by blowing off class. However, midway through the year, school became important to me and I buckled down and got caught up on my own. I studied hard using Barron’s review books — and even skipped a few parties to study. I finished the class well, but the best takeaways were discovering that self-learning mode and finding such a fun area of math. 

What did you like best about school? 

I liked the structure.  I also liked when teachers were nice to students – like Mrs. Short and Mrs. George.

What did you like least about school?  

My least favorite part about schools is that teachers (and the system) can sometimes be too harsh. There are mean teachers and sometimes the punishment for small infractions are overly punitive. This means students do not always connect the punishment with the behavior and so instead of behavior change – we have hurt students. Sometimes teachers are “too concerned about tasks” and not “concerned enough with the learner.”

What do you think schools (in general) do well? 

Today’s schools are culturally sensitive, still improving, but they have come a long way over the last 40 years. I like the work of Ruby Payne with regards to culture and economic differences.

Many schools also do a great job at educating a large number of students at one time.  I know an art teacher who provides art lessons to 2,000 students a week – and she says it is awesome.

I also think schools do well with “certain” students (the ones that conform, right-handed girls, etc.).

How do you think schools could be improved? 

I think schools could be improved if teachers were better trained with behavioral conditioning strategies and learned more about the powerful use of reinforcements. Teachers also need to make sure they are in tune with cognitive factors of learning (free will, moods, thoughts, and feelings) and the biological changes that growing children go through on their educational journey. Also, we need to sometimes give students a little power, along with rules and structure, but we need to empower more – especially for breeding leaders.

Classrooms need less sitting and more physical activity. Not just PE, but we need to let students move more.

Schools can also be improved if we taught emotion management at earlier ages and target the five Emotional Intelligence domains before middle school.

thank you for your participation

Thank you for sharing your reminiscences of school, Yvette, then and now. It seems education is as much a part of your life as it is of mine. I appreciate your suggestions for improving schools and agree with what you say about the system. It is always good to hear from an educator and how their early experiences being schooled affect their attitudes to learning and teaching. Thank you for contributing your voice to this series.

Thank you, Norah, for inviting me to share in this series. And thanks to all the teachers out there who give so much of their lives to invest in students and help them on their educational journey.

 Find out more about Yvette Prior on her blog.
Find out more about Yvette’s books here.

To purchase your own copy of her books, click on the book title or image.

Lady by the River (stories of perseverance and self-help resources)

Avian Friends (Poems about nature, faith, appreciating life, and coping with grief)

Conversate (Tips for Parenting Teens)

If you missed previous reminiscences, check them out here and here.

Look for future interviews in this series to be posted on Sunday evenings AEST.

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your comments. Please share your thoughts.

 

127 thoughts on “School Days, Reminiscences of Yvette Prior

  1. lindasschaub

    Norah – This was a wonderful interview and I learned a lot about Yvette, during her formative years and beyond. Clearly Yvette’s teachers were task masters but they instilled in you a desire to learn … after all Trig is difficult and you liked it! I never did well in any higher mathematics … I wondered where in the world I would ever use algebra and geometry and we never had Trig in high school and I never took math in college. My middle and high schools here were not good – our teachers and curriculum were not stellar and when I began college, I learned what I had missed. We lost accreditation two years in High school, so went only four hours of school per day and no extracurricular activities … that was not good for anyone hoping to achieve a scholarship in athletics, drama or music – I did not fit any of those categories. My education in Canada was more memorable and I had wonderful teachers each year until we moved to the U.S. in 1966. [Norah – you and I chatted one time when you did a “School Days” post on Hugh Roberts and he touched on how bullying affected his life … I also discussed bullying and its impact on my own life once we moved to the States.]

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    1. Norah Post author

      Linda, thank you so much for your wonderful comment on Yvette’s post and sharing so much of your own experiences. Thank you for reminding me of your comments on Hugh’s post. I’ve just been back to have another read and remain as appalled at what happened to you as I was when I first read them. You certainly missed out on a lot of opportunities you should have had growing up. It’s a good thing you’ve made up for the lack and it’s now all so far behind you. I’m sure some memories are still raw though. Some never seem to fade.

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      1. lindasschaub

        You’re welcome Norah – moving here to this school system was not good in all respects … education-wise and emotional/physical-wise, and it was enduring a similar abuse as Hugh was subjected to. But Hugh and I rallied back and are stronger today for those experiences. Yvette had good teachers who were demanding in some respects and that gave one a will to learn and grasp those tidbits of information – they are there for the taking. Our school system was not good and I was sadly lacking a good education upon high school graduation.

        I knew you would recall our “chat” and you are 100% correct Norah – I have tried to leave those bad experiences in the rear mirror, but occasionally they do rear their ugly head … I would not want to be a kid growing up in this day and age … it is trying for sure. Have a good day Norah. We have another rainy and chilly morn.

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        1. Norah Post author

          Hi Linda, Thanks for popping back to continue the conversation. I think you, Hugh and Yvette are the lucky ones who survived and are possibly stronger for your experiences. Not everyone does so well.
          I know what you mean about those experiences in the rear-view mirror raising their ugly heads. Sometimes they do it all too often. I guess if we develop strategies to deal with them, we’re well on the way forward.
          Enjoy your cooler weather. Ours is already too warm for spring.

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          1. lindasschaub

            Hi Norah – Yes, it is good we were stronger than most and can look back on it now and say we actually benefited from it, strange as it sounds. The quote from which the famous song that paraphrased this German philosopher is very true:
            “That which does not kill us, makes us stronger” – Friedrich Nietzsche

            Our weather is uncharacteristically cold for this time of year – we are 20 degrees colder than usual, and next week 30-40 degrees colder than normal. We had some snow this morning too. As an avid walker and someone who despises Winter, I am not happy for this turn of events. I am grateful I can work from home and not have to go out in the elements as I did for years when taking the bus to my job in downtown Detroit.

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            1. Norah Post author

              That quote of Nietzsche’s is an interesting one, Linda. I’m not sure that I agree with it, but perhaps it works in some situations, as it did for you.
              Wow! Those are huge drops in temperature. We have unprecedented bushfires causing devastation over here. Weather events seem to be happening everywhere. Enjoy working at home. I also enjoy the freedom it gives me.

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              1. lindasschaub

                We have had 6 inches of heavy snow today Norah and another inch overnight – we have broken a record from 1971. I fear that it is not going to just melt away and may be here for the duration of the Winter. Not great for me as I’m an avid walker. I enjoy that freedom too – I would never have begun the walking regimen if not for working at home and on a weather day like we had today, I am even more grateful.

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                1. Norah Post author

                  Oh wow, Linda. It doesn’t sound much like walking weather. Here it gets too hot to walk. I’m pleased you are able to stay snug at home and don’t have to brave that record-breaking weather.

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                    1. Norah Post author

                      Chilly!!! Actually, your 6 degrees is -14 to us. I’ve never experienced those sorts of temperatures. Are you suiting up to go outside? I think it would be rather brisk.

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                    2. lindasschaub

                      Yes and today we have set a record, not broken since they began keeping records on the weather in 1911 – it is just bone chilling out and I have no snow to shovel except for what the snow plow left at the end of my driveway (grrrr) and I may not be able to move that til later in the week when we get to the freezing mark. I do layer up Norah as I walk all Winter (weather permitting – I don’t like walking in the icy weather) so I have a lot of polar fleece hats, scarves, vests … most of these are left over from when I took the bus for 30 plus years. I actually never was cold while outside yesterday. I am sure glad I don’t have to drive in this awful weather.

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                    3. Norah Post author

                      I have no idea what it must be like living in a cold place like that, Linda. It is rarely what anyone would even call cold where I live. Stay rugged up and stay warm.

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  3. kevin cooper

    Nice to meet you Yvette. Sounds like you had a very positive school experience which is great. I do like your response to improving schools with teacher training in behavioural conditioning strategies paired with emotional development from an early age. Nice one. 🙂

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    1. Prior...

      Hi – thanks so much Kevin, and for the most part I did have a positive school experience – and I am grateful for that. But I did move to California for a year when I was in middle school and whew – I think if I had to finish my school there it would have been a lot harder. The schools were bigger and it was a different culture – and so I feel fortunate – and thanks for your nice comment – also – I enjoyed your post in Norah’s series and thank you for giving your time to teach… 🙂

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  4. Annika Perry

    Norah, a lovely ‘chat’ with Yvette all about school! Yvette, I am impressed, almost flabbergasted, with the vivid recall of your school life! Who likes Trig?!!😀 The structure of school life is important and it can be quite disconcerting when one leaves. Regarding moving around at school, many now offer morning sessions of ‘exercise’, running a mile a day etc – all fantastic steps in the right direction. Good for physical health but also clears the mind, ready for mental work!

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your lovely comment on Yvette’s interview, Annika. I think you’re right about safety in the structure of school and then being disconcerting when it is no longer available. I know many find that adjustment difficult when leaving school.
      I love what you say about movement in schools. It makes so much sense. Back in the 80s (dare I admit to teaching then) we used to have at least 15 minutes every day. It was a 15 – 45 program as I recall, so some days, I can’t remember how many, we would do 60 minutes. I was disappointed when there no longer seemed to be time for it. And sadder now, when there is little time made for children to play. I saw on the news here last night that people are calling for a mental health practitioner to be attached to every school as the lack of mental health is becoming an issue. If only they’d let the children play and take them out for some exercise each day, what a difference that would make — to mental health and learning.

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    2. Prior...

      Hi Annika – I did not know about all the extra exercise that they are offering – and I think they should keep it simple and just let students stand more often – sit less – and walk more. Running might not be good for all students and it can be so hard on the body – but walking (as I am sure you know) is the most underrated thing we can do for body, mind and spirt –
      also – I know a lot of folks who enjoy trig – and many that don’t – ha! But the best part of that class was that I got caught up on my own – and mastered it – however, the teacher, Mrs. Santamaria, never fully warmed to me once I changed mid way through. wish she had – but some teachers miss the growth and I was not mature enough yet to socially make that bond and new connection with her – but I learned as I went through the grades.
      Thanks again for the nice comment and wishing you a great day

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    1. Prior...

      Trent – thank you so much for your awesome comment! Brought a huge smile when I read it. And your comment reminded me how close some of us can be after years of connecting but still so much to share! Ahhhh – and I feel like I barely scratched the surface here with my school days – but did give a glimpse – anyhow – looking forward to connecting and getting to know more as we connect via blogosphere – 😊☀️

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  5. petespringerauthor

    Thumbs up to the less sitting comment from Yvette. Kids need opportunities to move. I cringed reading the comment about her colleague bragging about how tough she was. I’m not going to recommend bragging, but if someone is going to boast, at least make it for some redeeming quality. (Connecting with kids, making children feel good about themselves, and wanting to come to school.) I also like the story or connecting with the teacher who threw the eraser. Even when a teacher errs, he or she can teach the proper way to handle a mistake.

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    1. Norah Post author

      What a considered response to Yvette’s post, Pete, thank you. I, of course, agree with both of you about the movement, and about the qualities to boast about, if one were to do so. Yes, the eraser incident could have concluded quite differently.

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    2. Prior...

      Thanks for the detailed comment.
      The eraser incident reminds me that it was different times – it was 1979 and that teacher needed serious help with “classroom management training” = I think the start of the school year was tough for him and I think I was a little sassy that first few days – and well – I am glad that. teacher’s continue to have more and more training with classroom management – and super glad for the way things turned out – because Mr. C was a gift in my life.
      __
      and the teacher that said she was tough – was actually working in “higher ed” – but I think your comment still applies to any age:
      teachers should make this happen for all ages of students:
      ” Connecting with kids, making children feel good about themselves, and wanting to come to school.”
      well said, Pete, and I hope to write more about that “I am tough” comment later – because she really seemed to be missing the mark in how she defined being a good teacher/professor – and another thought that comes to mind was she likely had low self-esteem. because “small” people have to keep students small by Lording over them and by having a reputation as “tough” – but “effective” teachers build up students and rather than boasting of being tough – they look at each student and how their journey went with reaching objectives and how their role as teacher impacted it

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      1. Norah Post author

        I totally agree with these words of yours, Yvette: she likely had low self-esteem. because “small” people have to keep students small by Lording over them and by having a reputation as “tough” – but “effective” teachers build up students and rather than boasting of being tough – they look at each student and how their journey went with reaching objectives and how their role as teacher impacted it
        Beautifully expressed. Thank you.

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    1. Prior...

      Hi – and thanks for adding your comment – and when we moved and my son had to start a new Kindergarten class – one of the options we passed on seemed too punitive. We visited three times and twice more than half the class had their heads down on their desks in a punitive time out. One time it was 24 of the 30 children – ugh = no thank you….

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      1. Jules

        One of my children’s teachers in Middle School who co-taught (one did reading the other English I think) – expected the students to be at college level (at least that was my feeling). One day the students complained to the other teacher about the ‘nasty’ one. My son happened to be absent that day – But when she returned and found out what the class did – she ranted on the whole class about how irresponsible they were to judge her education. We had trouble with the same woman with our other child – but in a different way. I ended up pulling my child from her glass after that episode. Our school had a booklet called “The Parents Bill of Rights” that I had acquired and went to the principal to state my case for my child’s removal for his mental health! The principal wasn’t happy but he complied.

        One has to advocate for their children, their family. We were in the schools face so much that I thing when our youngest graduated that the school had a party because they didn’t have to deal with us anymore… well maybe not. 😉

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        1. Prior...

          Thanks for sharing your story! And by sharing it here on Norah’s site – well who knows who will
          Read it and the seeds you have dropped with it! Good for you for using the bill of rights like that and for being in tune!
          Two stories come to mind with what you shared – first – when my son was in preschool – I checked in a bit – but I realized I did do it the right way. At the end of the year – the teacher asked him to be reassigned from her class for the next year – she loved him (and he really was a sweetheart) but soon realized it was me- oh how humbling – and I did recall a time I asked about if she was teaching this or that! Well that experience helped so much because when he was in kindergarten – in a different state – I knew how to check in with teachers but in a supportive way! I didn’t suck up completely – but I volunteered a couple Times – brought supplies and showed support. It just so happens hat Mrs Henderson (san Jose CA) was amazing and a top notch teacher so it all worked out – but I learned that there is a right and wrong way to “keep guard”

          At that same time – I was working at the youth science institute and one of the reasons I was offered a promotion – was because I handled the handled the crabbiest of all moms! I had her red-haired some twice in week-long summer camps. The head director came outside one day and found me to say that this mom only ever had complaints! Her first compliments or bit of praise after years with this center was from my classes! I was honored and actually it was a god appointment because the new position meant more money and a few months later we needed to move and we qualified for our new place because of my new salary! Awesome
          But the real reason I wanted to share that story was to give you my view as a teacher – because we know which parents care extra- and with that red-haired child – his mom was in my face about a few things early on – but I did not get put off – I aim to please because her child was in my care! I diffuser her sorry and also have her extra details about our hikes and schedule – she needed that as momma bear and as a teacher – I aim to please – and for young students it is a family affair- and that has Paid off for me – to serve and not get defensive when a parent comes at me strong…. and you know – when I had extra supplies or sheets – I always sent them home with the parents that I knew were involved and would appreciate it.
          I am not bragging like I was “all that” with tough parents – but having a servant minded and respectful attitude helped – I have seen some teachers get offended way too easily!!

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          1. Norah Post author

            I think you’ve highlighted what is so important for the home-school relationship to work, Yvette. It is relationships, positive and respectful relationships. As a teacher (and as a person), I always find that developing positive respectful relationships is the best way to move forward. We are all better off for it.

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            1. Prior...

              Yes! Agree with all that you wrote – also – you know how I mentioned that I liked Ruby Payne’s research? Well one big reason why had to do with her work on the cultural and socioeconomic differences in families and in henrico county (2005) one school I subbed at – did a workshop with teachers using Payne’s research – and what that might mean with teacher-parent relationship.
              For example, if a teacher goes to a certain parent – and complains that he is not getting homework done and he was acting up in class. The mother would scold him, forgive him, then feed him –
              And send him back to school.
              This cultural pattern was real- beat, forgive, feed. But no behavior change in the classroom and so the teacher must find a new mode of working with the child for assessing his needs! Because going to the parent was not making a difference and might have befuddled things.

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              1. Norah Post author

                That’s interesting, Yvette. I guess what works for some, doesn’t for others. When I was young, if we were in trouble at school (which I never was of course 😉😉) we were in trouble at home, so that made a difference.

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  6. D. Wallace Peach

    Fascinating interview, Norah and Yvette, particularly Yvette’s feedback about what could be improved. I worked in children’s mental health and totally agree that teaching emotional fluency and self-regulation skills at an early age would go a long way. It’s such a core requirement for a successful life. ❤

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you so much for reiterating the importance of social emotional fluency, Diana. I appreciate that you picked that important part out of Yvette’s interview. Thanks for reading.

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    1. Prior...

      Hi Jacqui – so nice to share similarities with you.
      And even though I have only started publishing formal writing in the last few years – I always wrote a lot – – I keep journals – and write for newsletters and had my hands in forums and all that – so writing has also been a part of me – like you I am sure

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  7. Susan Scott

    Thank you Norah and Yvette. Yvette, I’m glad you highlighted the diversity of the learners and the need to acknowledge that. And you also point out the biological changes each child has. One size does not fit all, though each child benefits from positive re-inforcement. Lovely interview, much enjoyed. Trignometry – o my goodness, was that about angles and the hypotenuse and the circle, and I truly can’t remember. What I do remember was the high I got when I figured something out 🙂

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your thoughtful comment on Yvette’s post, Susan. That high you get when you figure something out is priceless, isn’t it? Children need more opportunities for that. We all do.

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    2. Prior...

      Hi Susan – thanks for the comment and I know about that high that comes from figuring things out. And actually – I would not have taken any more advanced math classes if Mrs. Short did not corner me in the hallway at the end of the year. She really got into my business (and I am SO thankful) because as a theatre arts major I did not need any more math – but she stepped in and super glad.

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  8. Charli Mills

    Norah, I enjoyed this interview with Yvette. I agree with you that she’s someone who offers a unique and positive perspective, such as the value of teaching Emotional Quotient before middle school. Wow, that could help with big issues facing students. She also mentions empowerment, a critical element of life-long learning that doesn’t get enough notice. This series is so enlightening.

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    1. Norah Post author

      Hi Charli, I’m pleased you enjoyed Yvette’s post and appreciated her thoughts about emotional intelligence and empowerment. They are very important for survival in the modern world. In fact, they always were.

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    2. Prior...

      Charli – that was a nice comment to read and I have really enjoyed getting to know you and the other flash writers over at Carrot Ranch – I had been meaning to join in with you all for while and 2019 was the year I made it happen. And I really love all the psychology you bring into your shares…. so much insight and wisdom

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  9. Bette A. Stevens

    Great ideas for improving schools, Yvette.Teacher education and allowing students to move more are right on target–getting them outdoors to explore the natural world is one way we can build a love of learning. I enjoyed your interview with Norah! 🙂 Sharing…

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks so much for you lovely comment, Bette. I agree with your suggestion of getting the children outdoors to explore the natural world. We have outdoor classroom day coming up on 7 November. I think part of every day should be outdoors. 🙂

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  10. Patricia Tilton

    I was especially interested in Yvette’s comments about wanting schools to teach kids how to manage their emotions management at earlier ages. I couldn’t agree more. And, I have seen an increase in childrens books in recent years on anger management, yoga, kindness, mindfulness,emotions/feelings, for Pre-K and elementary students, I’m glad that the publishers see the tools they are giving kids to cope in later years. I like her idea of schools “targeting the five Emotional Intelligence domains” before middle school. Excellent interview!

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    1. Norah Post author

      I agree with you about the need to teach emotional intelligence, Patricia, and also about the increase in new books with themes on those topics. It’s a pleasing development in children’s books and in education too.

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        1. Norah Post author

          It is a pleasure to have you participate, Yvette. What a wonderful discussion your post initiated. It added so much to the previous conversations, all of which I’ve thoroughly enjoyed.

          Liked by 1 person

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    1. Prior...

      Hi – thanks for your comment – and wanted to chime in and just say I give all the credit to my teacher’s and the public school system for giving me access to honors math and mrs. Short is the one that lectured me (in a. good way) in the hall to take geometry – which then led me to trig – and it is not as hard as it sounds (well I guess it depends on the background and the way it is taught – but I thought algebra was the toughest – esp if not taught properly)

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      Reply
  11. Erica/Erika

    Thank you Norah, for featuring Yvette here. I have recently started following her informative and interesting blog site. Yvette’s genuine, kind energy leaps from the page.

    I loved learning more about you, Yvette. You have led a diverse life. Education appears to always have been a priority along with the school of life. Of course, children and family rank highest.

    I appreciate how candid you are about some of the not so perfect moments. Fun and very interesting to learn more about you, Yvette. I love the photos! I am glad our blogs connected in this virtual world. I look forward to reading more:)

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your lovely comment about Yvette’s post, Erica. I agree with what you have said about her blog and am not surprised that you are also following her. Enjoy!

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
    2. Prior...

      Hi Erika – thanks for your sweet comment – and I have also enjoyed getting to know you in 2019! Someone gave me the latest copy of reader’s Digest last month and as I read through – I thought of you a few times! Good ol RD

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your lovely comment, Robbie. I agree with you about Yvette’s photos. They are very cute. I have found it interesting reading about all the different school systems and people’s responses to their school days. We don’t always get to talk about things like that but they were such formative years in our lives.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply

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