What do you create?

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I am a fan of creativity. I like to develop my own creativity, and I like to encourage the development of creativity in others.

One thing I always loved about teaching was the opportunity it gave me to be creative: writing stories, units of work, and lessons plans to interest and excite the children about learning. It is this love that drives me to write my blog posts each week, and to create new early childhood teaching resources for readilearn nearly every week.

Just as exciting was the opportunity to support the development of children’s thinking, imagination, and creativity. I am more in favour of treating children as individuals, than as one of a homogeneous group from which any difference is considered an aberration.  After all, imagination and creative thinking are what inspire and drive improvement, innovation and progress.

I affirm my belief in the power of creativity in my tagline: ‘Create the possibilities . . .’, a tagline I previously used for an independent school I was establishing.

create-the-possibilities

Preceding both was my first independent undertaking: Create-A-Way.  Create-A-Way provided a richer educational and social setting for my young daughter than what was generally available, allowed me to share my educational philosophy and knowledge, and provided the same rich learning opportunities for other children and their parents. The development of imagination and creativity was a focus.

Guiding parents in play sessions for parents and children.

Guiding parents in play sessions for parents and children.

One of the things I love most about responding to the weekly flash fiction challenges set by Charli Mills at the Carrot Ranch is the additional opportunity to engage in something creative and to hone my writing skills. The supportive environment of a welcoming community makes it a safe and enjoyable experience. There is something affirming about belonging to a community of other creatives, online or in -person.

karen

On Saturday I, along with a whole bunch of other women creatives, attended an excellent Book Marketing Masterclass conducted by authorpreneur Karen Tyrrell. (I am looking forward to interviewing Karen for the Author Spotlight series on readilearn in March.) The class was attended by writers of a variety of genres; including memoir, romance, science fiction, fantasy, YA, and picture books.

One of the attendees Chrissy Byers has created a lovely picture book The Magic in Boxes which “aims to capture the imagination of young readers and inspire creative play.”

the-magic-of-boxes

Not only does the book suggest ways of stimulating creativity using recycled materials such as cardboard boxes, the book is made from recycled paper. I think that’s pretty awesome. It’s a beautiful book with a wonderful aim.

lemons and grapefruit

For a little more on creativity; in a previous post, Are you a lemon or a grapefruit? I shared ten articles about creativity. They are still relevant and worthy of a read if you haven’t yet done so.

I also shared one of my favourite TED talks by Sir Ken Robinson How schools kill creativity. If yours is not yet one of the over 41 million views, I urge you to watch it. As well as sharing a very important message, Ken is hugely entertaining.

I hope I have convinced you of the importance and power of creativity. I thank Charli and her flash fiction prompt for the opportunity of revisiting some of my favourite articles and talks about creativity. This week her challenge is to “In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story using the theme, “women create.” It can be art, sewing, ideas, babies. What is at the heart of women as creators? Go where the prompt takes you.”

I’m a woman, and I create, and education is in my heart.

In response to Charli’s challenge, I thought I’d get a little dirty. I hope you like it.

Prize pies

“Life’s not on a plate. It’s what you create.”

Two little girls in their Sunday best

Snuck outside when they should have been at rest;

Splashed in the puddles, laughed in the rain,

Shared mud pies and murky champagne.

 

Two young girls with flour in their hair

Climbed on the bench from the back of a chair;

Opened up the cupboards, emptied out the shelves,

Less in the bowl and more on themselves.

 

Two young women watching TV

Decide master chefs are what they will be;

Enter the contest, invent new pies,

Wow the judges and win the prize.

thank-you-1200x757

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

 

 

45 thoughts on “What do you create?

  1. Dayne Sislen, Children's Book Illustrator

    Sir Ken Robinson’s TED talk was inspirational. I have believed this all my life with my own education, my kids education and now with my grandkids. I have a creative, incredibly inventive, intelligent grandson who just doesn’t fit into the neat cubbyholes of education. I hate to see his creativity and spirit taken away.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for sharing, Dayne. I’m so pleased that you, also, find Sir Ken’s talk inspirational. I hope your grandson is able to survive schooling and keep his creativity, inventiveness, and intelligence intact. We have a great need of that – it is our future!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your lovely comment, Donna. We do share a love of creativity. Thanks for providing a link to your blog. I hope many of my readers pop over to check it out. I apologise if I’ve missed some of your posts. I’ve had trouble with email, and this morning noticed that, in addition, all my WP notifications had been turned off somehow. Grr! I think I’ve fixed it now but I didn’t realise it wasn’t just part of the email issue.
      Have a great week. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. writersideup

        Norah, I’m glad you figured out your WP problem! And no worries, dear, believe me. And I haven’t put up a post on Creativity Cookbook in so long, I’d say the blog suffers from atrophy, not that Writer Side UP! is well-attended to either :-\ My health and trying to take care of changing many things around here, especially concerning EMFs, has consumed me, but I’m getting closer to getting all that under control and am hoping to be able to focus on other things that are being neglected. You enjoy your week, too 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. Norah Post author

          I noticed your lack of posts when I popped over. I’d thought you were giving me a nudge – which is quite okay by me. I’m sorry that your health is causing you some concern and I hope you get relief from the pressures and distractions soon. Look after yourself. xo

          Liked by 1 person

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          1. writersideup

            Thank you, Norah 🙂 oxox Things are slowly sort of coming together. Once decisions are made, I can take action and things begin to move forward. Now that I have the EMF meter, I need to learn how to use it, but even without truly knowing the gauges, I have the horrible feeling that our neighbors are causing us bigger EMF problems than we have IN the house *sigh* I intend to figure it all out, but it’s not easy 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

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              1. writersideup

                Ah, Norah, EMF=Electro-Magnetic Fields. We actually deal with 3 now, in a big way, because “wireless” keeps increasing exponentially. RF= radio frequency which is wireless transmissions, basically invisible lines of pulsing waves that enable us to have wireless connections, e.i., cell phones, laptops, cordless phones, etc. transmitted by cell towers, satellites (and dishes, including your neighbors’), phone bases, etc. The electric and magnetic fields are different and generated by electricity, from the current in the wires in your walls, through to the items and appliances themselves (TVs, refrigerators, microwave ovens, etc.), and, of course, all the generators and what-nots on polls outside, and now smart meters are becoming an issue in which, at least here in the U.S. electric companies are installing them on people’s homes and FORCing subjection to these waves. If you want to learn about all of it, this is one great source (not the only!): http://www.electricsense.com/

                Liked by 1 person

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                1. Norah Post author

                  Thanks for the information, Donna. Now I’m in the know. I didn’t like the site you linked to though. I couldn’t do anything if I didn’t fill in my email details – which I didn’t! 🙂

                  Liked by 1 person

                  Reply
                  1. writersideup

                    *scratches head* I didn’t have to do that, but perhaps I’m not remembering (?). It’s an excellent resource, though you can certainly Google around for more info on the different EMF radiation facts. Out of curiosity, I just checked and it’s a private site (http://www.electricsense.com/privacy-policy/). You don’t need to register to use it and they don’t share your email if they collect it if you order something. Anyway, I hope you look into it regardless of where 🙂

                    Liked by 1 person

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                    1. Norah Post author

                      I definitely will. Thanks for the education. I did Google EMF before I asked you about it. I think that’s the quickest way to find out what I don’t know, but so much came up in the results and I didn’t really know what I was looking for, hence I asked you. Perhaps the site responds differently for those outside the US. I’ll definitely look into it more. As I said, thanks for the education – so much to learn!

                      Like

  2. Hugh's Views and News

    I love participating in writing prompts/challenges, Norah. I also enter the occasional photography challenge. Both bring out a lot of my creativity, and if it were not for many bloggers, here on WordPress, many of the short stories I’ve written over the last three years would never have been created. Never say no to being creative.
    And what a delightful and lovely poem you’ve written. Poetry is one area I find it very difficult to be creative in (even with prompts). You did a grand job with being creative.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I know you speak the truth, Hugh. I’ve seen evidence on your blog and in your great book of short stories Glimpses. Or is that great short stories?
      Whichever, I’m delighted to accept your recognition of my attempt at poetry. Thank you. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. Pingback: Women Create « Carrot Ranch Communications

  4. Annecdotist

    Indeed, it’s very clear from your posts how much your creativity has fed into your professional practice which I’m sure has been inspiring for the children, parents and colleagues who’ve passed through your various classrooms. And tragic how much of this will be lost, or at least diminished, by the micromanagement of professions demanding everyone does the same way.
    I love your rhyming flash and feel confident that even if they didn’t become celebrity chefs, that early creativity will have enriched our lives. And it’s great to celebrate girls (not just boys) getting dirty. I hope your granddaughter likes it too.
    Glad you enjoyed your course, also.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your lovely comment, Anne. It seems a little lighter than many, which maybe means my post was too. That’s probably a good thing. I hope I have encouraged the children’s creativity. I have to say that children have been my best teachers, helping me recover what I lost in my own early years. I think that is what I enjoy most about being around young children. They have such a fresh approach to the world, and there is wisdom in that freshness that we often forget when we get bogged down in routines and responsibilities.
      Thank you for pointing out the positives. It helps me see, and appreciate them, too.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. Charli Mills

    I think your tagline resonates because it’s such an elemental part of who you are — creating possibilities for your children, students and early childhood educators. How wonderful that the teacher has never lost her creativity! I find your flash fictions have your creative stamp upon them. Great details — murky champagne, an active interest that leads to a creative life. I hope to hear more about your weekend workshop!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Charli. I do try to be honest in what I put out there. I love listening to children’s ideas. They are so inspirational and remind me of what I was denied as a little one, igniting it now.
      I’m pleased you enjoyed the flash. I enjoyed writing this one.
      Karen’s workshop was fabulous. I have so much to learn. I don’t know where to start.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  6. jennypellett

    Isn’t it amazing Norah that we are half a world away from each other yet we share such similar views. I smiled as I read throughout post, nodding in agreement at all of it-and then the Ken video…I’ve watched it countless times – he is SO inspiring. Why aren’t the powers that be listening to him?
    Lastly, your flash never fails to entertain. This one was particularly, poetically good. Bravo, Norah, keep the creativity a- coming! 😉

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      It is wonderful to connect with like-minded people, wherever they be. Sometimes it is difficult to find them close by. You and I are obviously both Ken fans. I find the video compelling and inspiring. I think the powers that be don’t listen to him because he can’t offer them big financial kickbacks. All the big corporations that make the structured programs and publish the tests can offer financial kickbacks. There’s nothing to make money out of what Ken suggests – it’s good sense, rather than cents. (That’s my 2 cents!)
      Thank you for your encouraging words about my flash. Much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  7. Patricia Tilton

    Beautiful post packed with things to ponder. I enjoyed you very creative poem. I love the progression in the girls ages and abilities. Also enjoyed the TED talk about schools killing creativity and not allowing for mistakes. Also visited your “readilearn” resource page for teachers and parents. Such an important source for activities that encourage creative play.

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Patricia, for taking such an interest in the content of this post. I appreciate it.
      I’m pleased you enjoyed the girls’ story. I wanted to show that creativity can be expressed in different ways but develop throughout life, if allowed.
      It’s good to know you agree with me about Ken’s talk. I find it inspiring every time I listen to it.
      Thank you for visiting readilearn. I appreciate that too. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  8. Steven

    Three pieces in one – and under 100 words – I don’t know how you do it. On reading it again, I realise that this is just one continue story but separated by a number of years each time. This pair obviously don’t mind a bit of grot.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  9. prior..

    I love your fiction piece and could feel the fun…
    ahhhhh- the wonder of it all.

    and the entire post flowed and the march author spotlight sounds interesting – and it sounds like this “creativity” topic has been one of your passion areas for a long time.

    going to the link now: Are you a lemon or a grapefruit?

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  10. TanGental

    I always enjoy the TEDs you put forward. I’m a bit ambivalent to all Ken says but he makes some good point here. And your poem is wonderful ( not sure if it should be ‘is’ or ‘are’ in line 2 of the lsst verse). Well done.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks for your support, Geoff.
      You know, I agonised over that “is” or “are” and set upon the “is”. Now that you have queried it, I realise immediately it should have been “are”. If I’d just substituted another noun, it would have been clear; for example “writers are what they will be” or “teachers are ” or “lawyers”. Fixed now. Thank you for pointing that out. I was thinking of chefs as a collective rather than a plural – that’s what did me in. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  11. thecontentedcrafter

    Oh ho Norah – down and dirty! I love your poetic story! I have a far away, dim memory of creating a real jelly like mud pie one summer at the river mouth, just where it ran into the sea. Maybe it was a combination of river silt and sand, whatever magic happened, it was a fabulous mud pie and i could never make one like it again. You are so very creative and your long association and commitment to making education meaningful for your students is wonderful. Keep going, the world needs you!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I love the sound of your magical mud pie. It is difficult to repeat true magic. I don’t know how the master chefs manage to pull it off every time!
      Thank you for your supportive words, Pauline. I appreciate them.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  12. karenwrites19

    Thanks Norah, for your kind mention on my “Excellent Book Marketing Masterclass conducted by authorpreneur Karen Tyrrell.” Can’t wait to appear on your Author Spotlight series on readilearn in March. Lovely to finally meet you face to face … cheers, Karen

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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