Handouts for Parents to Support Children’s Learning – #readilearn

Here at readilearn we recognise that not all learning takes place in school. We know that learning can occur anywhere at any time and continues throughout life. It can be planned or incidental. It can be fun and joyful. It can even cause frustration at times. In fact, some frustration may encourage the learner to push further and try harder to find a solution. That is especially so when the frustration occurs in a purposeful activity in which the learner is engaged and feels a need to solve. Unsuccessful attempts don’t mean failure. They mean it’s time to try again. We see this in situations from a child learning to walk or ride a bike to scientists finding a cure for disease. What we most need to do to develop a love of learning is inspire curiosity and creativity and avoid ringbarking either through confinement.

As the end of the school year in Australia approaches, most teachers and parents are looking forward to the holidays as much as the students are. The last couple of years have been tough with changes to teaching and learning circumstances and the increased involvement of parents in monitoring their children’s school learning at home. While parents may have become more familiar with teaching methods used in the classroom, it is important for them to realise that learning can still occur during the holidays without the formality of classroom exercises.

The most important things parents can do for children, right from birth and through their developing years and beyond, is to talk with them, play with them and read to them — every day. The same can be said for teachers.

I previously shared this wonderful TEDtalk by 7-year-old Molly Wright in a post about The Importance of the Early Years. But it is inspiring and watching it gives me joy and I thought watching it might also give you joy. It is definitely worth sharing with parents to encourage and affirm positive interactions with their children.

We also have some handouts of suggestions which you are welcome to copy and send home to parents. You can find them in the Classroom Management — For Parents collection. They are all free resources and suggest ways of increasing the learning in everyday situations, mostly by being aware of the opportunities that arise incidentally throughout the day.

21 suggestions for maintaining reading momentum during the holidays

25 ways to keep the children thinking mathematically during the holidays

Continue reading: Handouts for Parents to Support Children’s Learning – readilearn

21 thoughts on “Handouts for Parents to Support Children’s Learning – #readilearn

  1. Patricia Tilton

    Wow! I love that video! Just imagine how different our world would be if ALL children received a lot of strong and loving connections with parents. Love you post today! Your suggestions are excellent. Seems strange your school year is ending.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I agree with you, Patricia. It all begins with parents.
      I know our school year is different from yours. I always thought yours was strange too. 🤣 We follow the calendar year. And of course, our summer occurs from December to February so our longest school holidays are then too, and they wouldn’t occur mid-school year.

      Like

      Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      It is a wonderful Ted talk, Jim.
      Funny you think that about our school year (which matches the calendar year). I think that about yours. 🤣
      I guess we both have our longest school holidays in the summer.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

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