Who wants five-year old sheep? Bah!

Recently, thanks to a recommendation by Anne Goodwin, I read a great article on the website of The Writers’ Centre at Norwich. This article is called “Fuelling Creative Minds” and was written by Meg Rosoff. The article is part of The National Conversation about writing reading, publishing and bookselling, or why books matter.

Rosoff introduced her article by questioning what we consider to be success in life. She discussed a study of 268 men over seventy-five years conducted by George Vaillant who concluded that “warmth of relationships throughout life have the greatest positive impact on ‘life satisfaction‘”.

Rosoff said that,

“If you live a happy and fulfilled life, then you die successful. “

but wondered why, then, “do we persist in measuring success in terms of salaries, job titles and assets?” if they have little real impact on one’s happiness.

Rosoff suggested that a good place to start thinking about attitudes to success is in school.

The next part of her article was devoted to attitudes towards success in schools. Rather than provide just an outline of her thoughts, I am quoting them in entirety, as I don’t want to misrepresent her ideas and she says it all so well. While she discusses specifically the situation in the UK, I think many readers will recognise similarities to their own locale. I have highlighted parts that I find particularly noteworthy. I do recommend, however, that you follow the link and read her article in full.

Excerpt from: “Fuelling Creative Minds” by Meg Rosoff and published by The Writers’ Centre Norwich 1 March 2015

“In the twenty-first century, educational success is largely determined by the government.  The government puts in place a series of goals that evaluate children as young as three against measures of socialisation, reading proficiency, an understanding of numbers, the ability to answer questions in an acceptable, established manner, and later – during GCSEs and A levels – the ability to pass exams in up to twelve subjects and write essays in a strictly approved fashion.  

Success in school requires hard work and a competitive approach to study on the part of students – but more to the point, a successful student is one capable of achieving goals as defined by the exam graders, as defined by the government.

A successful student is one capable of matching learning to this very specific series of goals.

In other words, a child who reads all day is not a successful student.  A child who writes brilliantly and with a distinctive voice but can’t spell, is a failure. A child who loves history but can’t write an essay in the approved manner, is doomed.  A child who loves stories, who loves to dream, who makes unusual connections, whose brain works in unconventional, peculiar ways – but who can’t multiply 11 x12 – is not a successful student.

Successful students must sit still and concentrate for long periods of time, temporarily memorise large amounts of information, understand and achieve received goals, think inside the box.  A desire to please and a willingness to conform are key.

The least successful children in this sausage factory will be branded from the age of five. Children with parents or carers who don’t talk or read to them enough are most likely to fall into this category of early failures. As are dyslexic children.  Or eccentric thinkers. An irregular schedule, disorderly home life and financial instability all interfere with the attainment of ‘success’ as determined by the government.

Less support at home, fewer books, a less regular schedule, a less orderly home life, less healthy meals, less consistent love – all these economic or emotional disadvantages further condemn the five year old to failure.  Food banks, immigration problems, substance abuse problems, unemployment, parental absence or mental illness – all of these elements interfere with the attainment of ‘success’ as determined by the government.

I see them when I visit secondary schools – the children branded failures because they can’t get on in school. Because they’re bored, or not very verbal, or not very good at sitting still and taking information in as required in a classroom situation – or the ones who just don’t see why thirteen years of their lives should be spent taking exams they’re not good at, absorbing information in a manner that hasn’t changed much in two hundred years.  ‘Not a student’ is a label that has condemned decades of children to a diminished sense of what they’re capable of in life.  When in fact all it means is, ‘does not thrive within government parameters’.

Do I buy into the idea that these students are without value?  Of course not.  Put them in a different sort of learning environment or teach them something that stimulates their imaginations and they’ll be fine.  But sit them in a classroom for thirteen years with a series of targets chosen by a government that knows nothing at all about education and they’re doomed.

In contrast, the most successful children in this whole process of learning and taking exams will get all A*s and go to Oxford or Cambridge, after which they will go on to have what most people consider to be the most successful lives – the best jobs, the highest salaries, large and comfortable and expensive houses and cars.

And yet.

In a 2014 book, Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life, award winning American essayist and educator William Deresiewicz concerned himself with what’s going at the top level of American education.

‘Our system of elite education manufactures young people who are smart and talented and driven, yes, but also anxious, timid, and lost, with little intellectual curiosity and a stunted sense of purpose … great at what they’re doing but with no idea why they’re doing it.’

This was written about Harvard and Yale but applies just as well to elite British universities. Like the highest rated state primary and secondary schools, these institutions take few risks – they admit top performing, highly driven teenagers and turn out graduates with no motive to question the status quo, no motive to question the structure of society or the weight that society puts on a certain kind of success.  

If you win a beauty contest, you don’t dedicate your life to challenging society’s perceptions of beauty.

William Deresiewicz continues:

‘So extreme are the admission standards now that kids who manage to get into elite colleges have, by definition, never experienced anything but success. The prospect of not being successful terrifies them, disorients them. The cost of falling short, even temporarily, becomes not merely practical, but existential. The result is a violent aversion to risk.’

All of this is happening at exactly the moment at which the world most needs risk takers: individuals willing and able to retell the story of society in a more positive way.  People willing to take risks with meaningful social and political change. Hardly anyone would disagree that our political system needs changing – free market capitalism has led to terrifying extremes of wealth and poverty.  The pharmaceutical industry needs meaningful change along with the system of drug patents that price simple, inexpensive drugs out of the reach of entire populations whose lives they might save. The legal system favours those with money, as does education, as does housing.  In the meantime, there is little financial motive to stem – or even acknowledge – the devastating effects of global warming.  It is difficult to think of a single aspect of life on earth today that couldn’t do with rigorous deconstruction and rethinking.

If schools are going to train a better class of political leaders, entrepreneurs, scientists, parents, and social policy-makers, they’re going to have to ask themselves which qualities to promote.  If we require a more compassionate, more radical, less class-riven and self-centered definition of success, where does it begin?

I would like success to be redefined.  I would like a successful man or woman to be defined as one who thinks creatively and laterally, who questions authority and accepted wisdom, who lives thoughtfully, generously and not entirely for personal gain.  To be successful, I believe, it is important to leave the world a little bit better than you found it.

How do we do this?  By listening to the wise and enduring voices of our civilization – by encouraging each new generation to read history and philosophy and to think big thoughts – about religion, politics, ethics, love, passion, life and death and the origins of the universe.  The extraordinary imagination of our species – as expressed in poetry and fiction, music, art, dance – might someday spill over into cures for cancer and war and inequality. This will happen not by thinking about what we are, but what we might be.

A further striving after knowledge and meaning is the proper goal for education.  Everyone doesn’t need to achieve A*s.  But everyone needs to learn how to live a good, creative, questioning life.

What we don’t need are more five-year-old failures and more excellent sheep. “ 

Thank you

 

Thank you for reading. I always appreciate your thoughts and feedback but, if you have some to share about this article, I’m sure The Writers’ Centre would love to hear them too. If you have time, please copy and paste them over there as well to keep their conversation going.

 

19 thoughts on “Who wants five-year old sheep? Bah!

  1. Sarah

    Great article, Norah. In the US, even those “exceptional” students (with dyslexia, autism, or other so-called disorders) are expected to live up to the Government standards. And these standards are getting higher and expecting more from younger children. My preschooler is expected to know the alphabet before Kindergarten. My Kindergardener is expected to tell stories using words and pictures. And teachers are expected to teach this to all children, regardless of their difficulties.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. Bec

    Great article to share, Nor. Although I enjoy reading your synopses and reflections, including this in full was great. A complex topic which demands time and thoughtfulness.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. ruchira

    Loved your thoughts, Norah and I join in with you over this.

    Unfortunately, we live in a world where success is measured by $$, success and comforts. A world where love, care and humanity always takes a back seat thus, the preaching to kids that do well since that will land you to happiness.
    Phew!
    But would love to have a latter world and thus, say Amen to it!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks so much for joining in the conversation, Ruchira. I guess we can only change the way we think about things and work out for ourselves what success really is. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  4. Charli Mills

    What a potent article that gets right to the punch — five year old failures or sheep and school are culling the herds in kindergarten. You talk a lot about the issues that Meg Rosoff brings up and I think the most pervasive frustration is the government setting measurable standards that clearly have homogenized academic/adult success. It makes me think of Marnie, too and how she was a five-year old failure once. Her story of success will be an example of how to break out of the sheep mold! Thank you sharing this and facilitating the discussion. Interesting comments, too.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank your for adding to the discussion, Charli. Meg’s article has got a lot of people thinking. As you say, I have expressed many similar opinions previously but I really like the way that Meg said it.
      Your comments re Marnie have got me thinking about her a bit differently. I hadn’t thought of her as being successful, just a survivor. I’m not sure if her survival (as I see it at the moment) would be an example of how to break out of the sheep mould. Maybe I need to consider those possibilities a bit more. Thanks for stirring up the grey matter! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. macjam47

    This article is so right it’s scary. “But sit them in a classroom for thirteen years with a series of targets chosen by a government that knows nothing at all about education and they’re doomed.” – exactly what I’ve been saying for years.

    Liked by 2 people

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  6. TanGental

    This is such a powerful post Norah and I see it in my children. The Lawyer constantly struggled academically with undiagnosed dyslexia but found his ways of coping and coming through It meant he learnt a lot by listening and audiotapes and books and talking with people. The Vet by contrast had no problem academically. Now the Vet has a profession ahead she adores but is frustrated by her lack of width whereas the Lawyer is more widely engaged and more intuitive. He will break the mould somewhere whereas I suspect the Vet will remains clear eyed and utterly risk averse. So no more sheep.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks Geoff. Great to hear both your children have found their own ways of straying from the flock to find their own paths. I sure their shepherds (parents) had much to do with encouraging them to find their ways. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

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  7. writersideup

    This actually brought tears to my eyes:

    “The least successful children in this sausage factory will be branded from the age of five…

    Less support at home, fewer books, a less regular schedule, a less orderly home life, less healthy meals, less consistent love – all these economic or emotional disadvantages further condemn the five year old to failure.”

    And I couldn’t agree more with…

    “A further striving after knowledge and meaning is the proper goal for education. Everyone doesn’t need to achieve A*s. But everyone needs to learn how to live a good, creative, questioning life.
    What we don’t need are more five-year-old failures and more excellent sheep.”

    What a wonderful post, Norah—as always 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks Donna,
      Meg Rosoff said it all very well didn’t she? I’m pleased you enjoyed reading her article. I appreciate the points you have taken away. They are excellent.
      Thanks for your support. I know you are doing what you can to help others learn how to live good, creative, questioning lives too. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  8. Annecdotist

    Glad I was right in thinking you’d connect with this article, Norah, and thanks for the acknowledgement. I think it raises much wider questions around what kind of society we want, questions that somehow never get properly addressed as we continually replicate the systems that favour the elite. We’re lucky there are voices like yours and Meg’s speaking out against this, but it’s a difficult system to change.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your support, Anne. Change can be a long slow process, but the more we express what we want there to be, the more chance there is of achieving it. Meg’s voice is a strong one and I am happy to hang onto her coattails for a bit! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

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