Trio recognised for reducing poverty for 60 million people

#WATWB Trio recognised for reducing poverty for 60 million people

It’s the end of the month again, so time to share good news and spread some joy throughout the world with the We Are the World Blogfest (#WATWB).

This month I am sharing the news of three US economists who were awarded the 2019 Nobel Economics prize for their work in fighting poverty. The three economists are Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo and Michael Kremer. In the 50-year history of the Economics prize, Esther Duflo is the youngest, and only the second female, to be awarded the prize.

The focus of the work for which the prize was awarded is education and healthcare. Over 60 Million children in Africa and India have benefited from the work.

Read the whole story here.

Click here to read more good news stories shared by other #WATWB bloggers.

If you like to spread good news, you can join in too and help us make critical mass.

As founders of #WATWB say, our newsfeeds often overflow with disasters and tragedies of all sizes, from large to small, that may overwhelm us with feelings of hopelessness and a loss of faith in the goodness of humanity. WATWB aims to combat those feelings with good news stories. They say, “There are many an oasis of love and light out there, stories that show compassion and the resilience of the human spirit. Sharing these stories increases our awareness of hope in our increasingly dark world.”

If you would like to join in with #WATWB, here are the guidelines:

1. Keep your post to Below 500 words, as much as possible.

2. Link to a human news story on your blog, one that shows love, humanity, and brotherhood. Paste in an excerpt and tell us why it touched you. The Link is important, because it actually makes us look through news to find the positive ones to post.

3. No story is too big or small, as long as it Goes Beyond religion and politics, into the core of humanity.

4. Place the WE ARE THE WORLD badge or banner on your Post and your Sidebar. Some of you have already done so, this is just a gentle reminder for the others.

  1. Help us spread the word on social media. Feel free to tweet, share using the #WATWB hashtag to help us trend!

Tweets, Facebook shares, Pins, Instagram, G+ shares using the #WATWB hashtag through the month most welcome. We’ll try and follow and share all those who post on the #WATWB hashtag, and we encourage you to do the same.

The co-hosts for this month are:

Sylvia McGrathLizbeth HartzShilpa GargMary Giese, and Belinda Witzenhausen.

Please pop over to their blogs to read their stories, comment and share.

Click here to join in and enter your link on the Facebook page. The bigger the #WATWB group each month, the greater the joy!

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your comments. Please share your thoughts.

47 thoughts on “#WATWB Trio recognised for reducing poverty for 60 million people

  1. Patricia Tilton

    Thanks for sharing! I was particularly moved by Sylvia’s post on the healing power of a Vedic mantra and the power of music, like Mozart, to relax. My husband’s uncle was a famous composer and he often talked about what music does to the brain. He always said musicians (and mathematicians) develop more of their brain because of their exposure to music. Like the idea behind WATWB progject and wish I had time to get involved. Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks so much for reading and for popping over to read others’ posts, Patricia. I was interested to read about your husband’s uncle, the composer. I’ve always considered music to have a large mathematical component. It would be wonderful if you could join in #WATWB, Patricia, but we must prioritise our time. You share lots of good news with your reviews of wonderful children’s books.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Patricia Tilton

        His uncle often commented on the similarities in brain development of musicians and mathematicians. They used/developed larger portions of their brains. I wish I could go into detail, but our conversations were years ago. He left us before his 95th birthday. If you are interested you can google him — Robert Ward composer. He won a Pulitzer in 1962 for his opera “The Crucible,” based on Arthur Miller’s play. And a year before his death he received the National Endowment for the Arts for Opera Honor for his lifetime body of orchestral and operatic work. My husband, Ward, looks just like him.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. Norah Post author

          Thanks, Patricia. I did Google him. What an eminent and prolific composer. I’m sure the family is very proud of his contribution. Is your husband also a musician, just like him? Am I right in assuming he was your husband’s mother’s brother? (Just thinking about his name, Ward. I don’t think he’d be Ward Ward? That would be Two Wards, but perhaps I shouldn’t make a joke, just in case.)

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  2. Erica/Erika

    I love how you and other bloggers share the good news, Norah. I believe you create a ripple effect. You said it well, how our newsfeeds overflow with disasters and tragedies. An often common denominator with making change is Education and Healthcare. Thank you for educating us:)

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. Jules

    I have to look at my online Good News everyday – part of my plan to stay sane!
    Just the other day a worker in a charity shop returned a large amount of money that the patron had forgotten that they stored in a coat pocket.

    It does make one very happy to see other humans care for other people and the planet too!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  4. hilarymb

    Hi Norah – I saw they’d won the prize … and I’ve just checked Esther Duflo’s Wiki page – which gives a little more detail about their projects and experimentation – not experiments per se … but people working together – teachers and students … it does sound as though it’s helping particularly in India and Africa. Great for us all – thanks for highlighting the winners for #WATWB … cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you so much for your wonderful comment, Hilary, and for commenting that you checked out Esther Duflo’s Wiki page. It prompted me to do the same. It is a great project and influencing so many others, affecting so many lives in positive ways. I love to hear good news about projects like these. I’m sure there is much more that we don’t hear about though.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. bikerchick57

    Thank you so much for sharing the results of the Nobel prize in Economics fo #WATWB. I’m thrilled to see a woman part of this trio, but more importantly that they have impacted resolution to poverty in the world. It’s necessary work that they are doing and using evidence based science to formulate action is brilliant. Kudos to all three winners!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  6. Susan Scott

    Great post Norah thank you. Glad the stats were noted ie that UN says that while poverty has been halved since 2000, in reality a great percentage of people live below the poverty line in India and Africa. Also glad the team stated that education and healthcare the way to go to address this problem of poverty.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Susan. And thanks for picking out some of the data to mention. We still have a long way to go but education and healthcare are steps in the right direction, I think.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

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