Getting active with maths – Readilearn

Many games involve children in practising maths skills, and playing games is a great way of incorporating fun into the maths program. With the additional benefit of supporting the development of social skills and, oftentimes, literacy skills, there is no reason to not include games. A daily dose of fun with maths contributes much to an enjoyable classroom experience, developing positive attitudes to maths, in addition to providing opportunities for consolidation and practice of maths learning.

Adding a little physical activity to the game increases the benefits, and there are many simple games that can be played with the whole class, indoors or out; some that require equipment and some that don’t; some that take just a few minutes, and some that take several. Many games can be invented on the spot to suit current learning.

Continue reading: Getting active with maths – Readilearn

10 thoughts on “Getting active with maths – Readilearn

  1. Jennie

    You are so right, Norah. Math is much more than counting and recognizing numbers. I discovered a great board game. Shut The Box. Apparently it is not new at all. Great game. Of course activities that move little bodies are the best learning of all.

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your comment, Jennie, and for telling me about Shut the Box. I hadn’t heard of it so had to Google it. (Where would we be without Google?) What a fun game. I can think of lots of variations that could be invented using this model. It could also be played with larger cards in a larger space so that children are more active when playing. What fun! It’s great to learn new games. I think this one is perfect for maths groups. I like the way it challenges children to think of different ways numbers can be combined. I’ve shared a few resources for that purpose recently. πŸ™‚

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  2. Patricia Tilton

    Such an informative post. I would have loved to have a teacher like you when I was young. I did not like math as a child. If I would have had a creative teacher like you who made it fun and helped me learn in other ways, it may have made a difference. I see the benefit in what you are doing. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your supportive comment, Patricia. I very much appreciate it. I’m sorry you didn’t like maths as a child. Sadly, I think that

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    2. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your supportive comment, Patricia. I very much appreciate it. I’m sorry you didn’t like maths as a child. Sadly, I think that’s the way for many.

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  3. thecontentedcrafter

    I do find it fun to read these posts Norah – it takes me back and I start saying ‘and, and’ and telling myself stories πŸ™‚ Your introductory ideas are relevant and fun and I’m sure the additional material is rich and varied. I should have loved such a resource in my first years of teaching when we can use all the help and inspiration going. I hope you are getting lots of interest from the teaching community and parents too.

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