Photographs tell Stories #flashfiction

This week at the Carrot Ranch, Charli Mills challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story about “the old photograph.” What is captivating about it? Where did it come from? How does it incite a story? Go where the prompt leads!

One of the things I think we need to encourage most in our children is curiosity: I wonder — how, when, where, why, what, who, what if …

children ask questions to find out about the world and how things work

Curiosity got me into lots of strife when I was a child. Curiostiy is where Charli’s prompt lead me. I hope the story makes you as curious as are the characters in it.

Photographs tell Stories

Nothing would dampen Megan’s curiosity. The slightest hand or foothold was irresistible. If none existed, she made one.

Mary gasped. Megan was atop bucket, on stool, on chair, on table, stretching for a box on the top shelf. Mary didn’t breathe as, in slow motion, Megan swiped the box and tumbled in a mess of wood and plastic. Mary, in fast-forward, grabbed arms and legs before she hit; but the box bounced, spewing its contents across the floor.

Megan plucked out an old photograph.

“Who’s dat, Mum?”

Mary trembled. Could it be her? The one in his poem? Who?

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

35 thoughts on “Photographs tell Stories #flashfiction

  1. Kate

    I could just ‘see’ Megan in action – reminded me of my son who used many a piece of furniture to climb and get what he wanted. And then the twist to keep us guessing. Good one.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. Jules

    Your piece reminds me of the ‘war chest’ we inherited from my FIL (he should rest) – His wife it seems was never curious about what was in it and it was only open after he passed.

    I like that you leave us curious 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      It was very similar to that. It was a chest of the mother’s father’s things. He’d written a poem about his first love (not the woman’s mother) but she had never been identified.
      I’m pleased you remained curious.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Jules

        It is just a tad unfortunate that a few promises of love due to war weren’t able to kept, especially after the solider ended up returning home. Few stayed in the country where the war was. And perhaps only a very few of the ‘partners’ were able to be brought back to the country of the soldier who fought.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
  3. Pingback: The Old Photograph « Carrot Ranch Literary Community

  4. Charli Mills

    Norah, that’s a great collage of curious children. We are born with such wonder! Mary is a frazzled mom and I enjoyed the unfolding scenario but did not expect the revelation of a mystery. Good to know Mary retained her own curiousity.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I hope the unexpected mystery wasn’t too much of a surprise. I meant it to be a snippet that raised more questions than it answered.

      Like

      Reply
  5. D. Avery @shiftnshake

    Bit of a twist there? From curious child to curious wife? Maybe Mary is also grasping at created holds and will let go to find all is well, not the worst she can imagine.
    Love your portrayal of this curious child; intrigued by the curiosity of the adult.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks, D. I appreciate your comment.
      The photo was actually in an old box of her father’s “stuff” that she’d never wanted/bothered to look at after he’d gone. More of a family mystery being filled out, not impacting her as a wife.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.