Waiting for life to begin

Waiting for life to begin

Carrot Ranch flash fiction challenge waiting

This week at the Carrot Ranch, Charli Mills challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about having to wait. Who is waiting and what for? Think about how the wait impacts the character or the story. Go where the prompt leads!

There are many things in life for which we wait. Children wait for the holidays, for birthdays, for Christmas and Easter. We often say that much of the joy is in the anticipation. But if we are always focused up what’s up ahead, we may miss the pleasures of the present moment. So, while I’ve gone dark in my response to Charli’s prompt, it is meant simply as a reminder to not let the everyday pleasures of the here and now slip by unnoticed. Enjoy life! We never know what lies ahead.

The Waiting Game

Her entire life, she’d waited:

To be old enough, big enough—

To have left school, completed her degree—

To have enough money—

Until after the wedding—

For the birth of her children

For her children to have started school, left school, left home—

When would be the time, when she could choose what she wanted, for her, no conditions imposed?

In the waiting room, she contemplated these things and delivered her own answer—never! Death was knocking, refusing to wait. She’d hoped to live before she died but life got in the way.  Ah well, the waiting was over.

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

57 thoughts on “Waiting for life to begin

  1. Marsha

    What a moving poem! As I sit here waiting in my life it is a reminder to make the most of each moment. Waiting is also a tool to get past the hard things in life to have positive events to wait for. Wouldn’t it be great if we could say, “Wait, God, I’ve got to finish… We need to have projects big and worthwhile enough to keep us moving.

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    1. Norah Post author

      There’s so much raw truth in your words, Marsha. They cut deep. Yes, if only we could make all our own decisions about time. I wonder how we’d choose.

      Liked by 1 person

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      1. Marsha

        Unfortunately, I’ve discovered over time that some of my decisions have been flawed. Overall, I’m pleased, though. Waiting, anticipating, longing and hoping is part of the journey without which the things and experiences we acquire would not have the value they have. Just think if we popped out a baby the day after we had sex – every time!!! Would children then be valued? In retrospect, I think the subject of your poem may have led a life of meaning well-examined and full of purpose. ❤️❤️❤️

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  2. roughwighting

    GREAT story reminding us to enjoy EVERY SECOND of EVERY DAY – not to wait for “something better” or “different.” I’m going to breathe into this idea – waiting into not caring what I’m waiting for. Just being.

    Liked by 2 people

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  3. Molly Stevens - Shallow Reflections

    What a gift to read your flash, Norah. I retired last November and now we’ve been waiting for the right time for my husband to retire, too. We’ve delayed gratification through the years so we could both retire, even though he is younger than I am and not eligible for Medicare or social security yet. Despite our planning, now that he’s pulled the trigger on resigning from his job, the doubts have swarmed in along with worries about the future (especially health insurance which is tied to employment). But if we keep waiting, then what? Could be the scenario you outline in your flash.

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  4. dgkaye

    Loved this Norah. No putting off for tomorrow what we can do today. ❤ BTW, your Twitter button has gone as it has on many WP blogs when I try to share. I've been using an 'Add any' extension which allows me to share via them. Wondering if you are seeing my tweets thru this method ? 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you so much for your kind words, Debby. And thanks for alerting me to the Twitter issue. I seem to have everything linked correctly, and it’s there for me. I wonder why it’s not for you. Strange things in the blogosphere. I haven’t been on Twitter since the weekend (busy week). I’ll see if I can notice when I next go on. Thank you for your kindnesses.

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  5. Charli Mills

    Death waits for no one and yet we do often forget to live in the moment. Your cautionary tale speaks of living from milestone to milestone to gravestone. I do like to wait with anticipation for things like holiday celebrations, but the rest of the waiting proves me impatient.

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    1. Norah Post author

      I know what you mean about impatience, Charli. I not impatient for death though. I am happy to wait (in good health) for as long as possible.:)

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  6. Jacqui Murray

    What a poignant story, and thought. I remember when I decided I was done waiting. It didn’t happen until late in life but I finally got tired of thinking life was in the future. Thanks for these thoughts, Norah.

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  7. Jules

    You have reminded me of my MIL – She did live a full life in her own way into her 90’s.
    Waiting for a war to end, waiting for her man to return, waiting for her children to be what ever they could. It wasn’t until the very last month of her life that she finally chose to give up reading the daily paper! She had fought and beaten several illnesses. But she would only do what she wanted on her terms.

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  8. jenanita01

    This struck a massive chord with me, Nora… I have been waiting for so long to be able to live the way I want to and it’s beginning to look as though that day won’t happen in time.
    Another good reason for being careful with the choices we make. Some of them last a lifetime!

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    1. Norah Post author

      I hope the day does come soon, Anita. Choices can be difficult. We make what we think is the best at the time, but it doesn’t always seem to work out as if it was so. However, we never know and can’t go back for a do-over, unfortunately. Enjoy!

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  9. Renaissance Renee

    This is very poignant, Norah. I relate to it so much. It’s exactly what happened to my cousin and friend who inspired me to write Turtle Love. Why do we find it so difficult to remember to live in the now as fully as possible?

    Liked by 3 people

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for reading, and for your lovely comment, Renee. It is sad to see someone not enjoying the life they have as they wait for something better to happen. We’ve only got one go at it (that most of us are aware of anyway) so we’ve got to make the most of it. It’s too short to let it slip away. That you found the inspiration for Turtle Love there is a good thing though. It’s a book worth writing — and reading!

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  10. thecontentedcrafter

    I can really relate to this Norah, bleak as it is it is also true. I felt I spent most of my life waiting – waiting just as you enumerated. When I was 49 an accident followed by a couple of heart attacks woke me up. I am one of the lucky ones. “Enjoy life! We never know what lies ahead.” So true and that’s been my motto for the ensuing twenty years!

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    1. Norah Post author

      I’m so pleased we didn’t lose you in that accident or in those heart attacks, Pauline. What a loss it would have been to have never met and shared our ideas, and for me to have never appreciated your beautiful artwork. Choose life! It’s a great motto.

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    1. Norah Post author

      I know, Robbie, but it was meant as a positive reminder to not let life slip by unnoticed while constantly waiting for something else to happen. Perhaps it was a reminder to self to be in the present moment. 🙂

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