Reeling in the fishermen

This week at the Carrot Ranch, Charli Mills challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less) write a fish tale. It can be about fishing from any angle, about those who fish, or what might be caught. Go where the prompt leads.

I cast my net hoping to catch an idea.

Would I share some fish-themed picture books? For example:

The Little Fish that Got Away by Bernadine Cook and Corbett Johnson

The Little Fish that Got Away, written by Bernadine Cook and illustrated by Crockett Johnson

one fish two fish by Dr Seuss

One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, by Dr. Seuss

The rainbow fish by Marcus Pfister

The Rainbow Fish, by Marcus Pfister

Would I consider rhyming words?

dish

fish

squish

swish

wish

fish on a dish rhyming words

Perhaps a childhood skipping game?

Fish, Fish,

Come into the dish.

Fish, Fish,

Turn around in the dish.

Fish, Fish,

Touch the bottom of the dish.

Fish Fish, run out of the dish.

Fish fish come into the dish skipping game

Fishy sayings?

something fishy going on around here

Sounds or smells fishy

A fish out of water

A dead fish handshake

Fell for it, hook, line and sinker

Plenty of fish in the ocean

Or maybe a childhood story?

When I was a child, my father fished a lot in his spare time. As well as being a cheap way of feeding his large family, he probably enjoyed getting out on the water in his rowboat for some peace. When the fishing was good, it could be on the menu twice a day, seven days a week. Exaggerations, maybe, but sometimes it seemed that way.

I did accompany him once. Neither of us caught anything edible. I caught a knotty eel, a tiny trumpeter and a desire to never go fishing again. I never have. Catching words is much more to my taste.

For my response to Charli’s prompt, I have gone with a story from my childhood. It incorporates some of the ideas that got caught in the net. I hope you like it.

Reeling in the fishermen

She sat by the window watching as the invisible painter coloured the morning sky. These moments lost in waking dreams, with the youngest of her brood suckling quietly, were precious. Slamming car doors and laughter interrupted the silence but not her thoughts. An occasional word invaded her consciousness…haul, fishing, catch. Wait—her man, a fisherman, was home. The night was not conducive to fishing. She leaned forward. Two dark figures unloaded a ute. They had neither lines nor nets, and it sure wasn’t fish in those boxes. “Fisherman, eh?” she thought as she dialled the local police. “You’re hooked.”

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

45 thoughts on “Reeling in the fishermen

  1. Jules

    So many good children’s books with fish. I can’t find the one I read to my sons and then my grands. It only had ten words that were repeated. 🙂

    I was never one for fishing having to put something on a hook. But I know many who do fish and stock up their freezers for winter. Fishing and hunting. I fish and hunt in the grocers. 😉

    I like your flash 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I also hunt and fish in the grocers. How fortunate we are to have such time-saving choices. How we still rue the lack of time though. There’s never enough.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Shallow Reflections

    You captured so many feelings in this 99 word piece, Norah. Very entertaining and I love that it was based on truth. I do not go fishing in real life, either. Though I love to watch the invisible painter color the morning sky. I had to look up the word ‘ute,’ too. Thanks for teaching me a new word! – Molly

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for reading and for your lovely comment, Molly. I’m pleased you enjoyed the post and the story in which my Mum was the “star”. Now that I think about it, I think I’ve heard utes referred to as “pickup trucks” in movies I’ve watched. I wonder what they are called elsewhere.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. Charli Mills

    I remember The Little Fish! I haven’t seen that book in a long time. You found much to share that’s fishy! I enjoyed your family story and can imagine why you never caught the desire to go again. I was surprised by your flash and liked the tale from a fisher-wife’s perspective. She’d be alert to the comings and goings of the waterway. Hooked! Great use of the term!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Christy. I’m pleased you liked the ending of the story. It’s true. It was my Mum who overheard the “fishermen”, realised they weren’t genuine, and called the police. 🙂

      Like

      Reply
  4. Hugh's Views and News

    This post is bursting with creativity, Norah. And I fell in love with that first line of your piece of flash fiction. ‘She sat by the window watching as the invisible painter coloured the morning sky.’ What a magical way to open a story, which only went on to lead me up the wrong path. You certainly hooked me and wound me in. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your generous comment, Hugh. Much appreciated. I’m pleased you enjoyed the post and the flash. My Mum helped wind those “fishermen” in too. I was very proud of her.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. roughwighting

    You are so creative, Norah. Loved your list of kids’ fish books, and your own fish tale of you and your dad. I’ve never picked up the desire to fish, either, even though I love the water, I love the solitude of sitting out in the water, and I enjoy eating fish. But I get seasick and burned in the sun, so I’ll ‘catch’ my fresh fish at the local grocery store. 🙂 I like your female character in your flash fiction. She’s a smart one. I hope the police got there in plenty of time.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for adding your thoughts and experiences, Pam. I catch my fish the same place as you. 🙂
      My Mum was pretty clever and pleased to help catch the crooks. They were living next door to us at the time, but not for long. The police did get there in time. 🙂

      Like

      Reply
  6. Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

    Fabulous flash Norah. You painted a gorgeous early morning scene with the woman suckling her baby. The ending brought a smile. Loved the humour. Another one to add to your list “Only dead fish go with the flow.” A very enjoyable post and enjoyed your childhood memories.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I’m pleased you enjoyed my flash BOTS, Irene. Thank you for your encouragement.
      I find your saying about dead fish going with the flow amusing. It’s obviously not so good to go with the flow. No wonder I usually try to go against it. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Debby. I’m pleased you enjoyed the story, based on a real incident. Mum was pleased to do her bit to capture the crooks. No fishing for either of us!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  7. Tina Frisco

    Great little story, Norah. I sure wasn’t expecting that alarming ending, especially after such a tranquil beginning. Well done! And I love, ‘While I might wish to have a fish upon a dish . . .’ ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your kind words, Tina. I’m pleased you enjoyed the post. I think my mother was a bit surprised at the ending too, but pleased she helped capture the crooks. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  8. D. Avery @shiftnshake

    Yes, you hooked your readers and reeled us in Norah. Left us gasping in surprise.
    I offer up for children’s books Leo Leonni’s Swimmy and for fishy sayings, around here folks say that company is like fish; you don’t want either around after three days.
    I enjoyed all parts of your post.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I think the fishermen were probably gasping when the police arrived too! 🙂
      I forgot about Swimmy. I haven’t read it in such a long time. Thank you.
      That’s a funny saying about company and fish. Thanks for adding to the collection.
      I’m pleased you enjoyed the post.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  9. Annecdotist

    What a lovely story, Norah: a beautiful image of the sunrise and you capture the reverie of the nursing mother so well. Fortunately she’s jolted out of it this time to recognise what’s going on. Plus an extra mystery for me as I had to check on the meaning of ute, although I could sort of guess and maybe I’ve come across before in my reading. Glad you didn’t make yourself choose between the various options the prompt presented to you.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I’m pleased the flash worked well, Anne. I tried to recreate the picture as I remember hearing of it happening, with a little fictionalisation. My Mum was quick to let the police know there was a catch waiting for them.
      I didn’t realise Ute was an Aussie term. I had another ask for the meaning of the word this week. Thanks for pointing it out.

      Like

      Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I think the “fishermen” were probably surprised when the police arrived too, and wondered how they’d been caught! 🙂

      Like

      Reply
  10. Jennie

    Your flash was excellent, with an unexpected twist at the end. And, I dearly loved the children’s books you included, the rhyming words, and the childhood games. Thank you for a terrific post.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I’m so pleased you enjoyed the post, Jennie. The flash was a true-ish story, only the finer details were changed. My mum helped bring those thieves to justice.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I’m pleased you enjoyed this story, Pauline. It’s based on a true story. My Mum really did hear the ‘fishermen’ talking and called the police. She was a good citizen. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  11. Pingback: Reeling in the fishermen – The Militant Negro™

I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s