Mum Selfie #99WordStories

This week at the Carrot Ranch, Charli Mills challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less), write a mom selfie — a story that creates an image of a mom. No one mom looks alike or fits a maternal mold. Who is she? Go where the prompt leads!

Mothering

She paused in the shopping mall, one arm cradling her week-old infant, the other hand her breast as she gently positioned it enabling the infant to suckle. So engrossed was she in her newborn that the world of passing shoppers and nearby café chatter was non-existent. Her face radiated love, peace and joy, the child’s adoration, contentment and bliss. Serenity. I smiled as I passed, captivated in the moment, drawn into the circle of life and love, both envying and admiring her confidence and lack of inhibition in a situation won for her by generations of mothers before her.

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

Note: The collection of stories made in response to the previous prompt Extraction, including mine, can be read at the Carrot Ranch.

39 thoughts on “Mum Selfie #99WordStories

  1. Michael B. Fishman

    This was a beautiful snapshot, Norah. I was able to both visualize and feel the scene. I don’t understand why so many people believe that mothers shouldn’t nurse in public, or that they should be forced to cover their baby. It makes no sense to me.

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  2. Pingback: Mom Selfies Collection « Carrot Ranch Literary Community

  3. Patricia Tilton

    Your story is captivating, your writing beautiful! I’m sorry you haven’t heard much from me, but I have been dealing with a family emergency that past few weeks. I’m hoping things begin to calm down.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Norah Post author

      Yes, Jacqui made a similar comment, Anne. Perhaps I underestimated the child’s age, but I don’t think by much. These days, many mums take their bubs home on Day 1. I was surprised by a parent of a child I was teaching (this is 20 years ago) who gave birth in the morning and was at school that afternoon to pick up her child – with her new baby, and happily allowing the children to look at it (fairly closely, I thought). When I had Bec (35 years ago), I was in hospital for 5 days. Mum had to ‘convalesce’ for 10. Times change and it’s not so much regarded as an ‘illness’ any more and many mums are keen on keeping fit. Breastfeeding in public seems to be more acceptable in public now. It’s interesting how times and attitudes change.

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    1. Norah Post author

      Maybe I underestimated the baby’s age, but it wouldn’t have been more than a couple of weeks. I’m not sure why the mum had the baby out, but I was pretty impressed by what I saw. I spend a lot of time parent/child watching. Nowadays, many mums take their bubs home on Day 1, so they are probably fairly confident in a matter of days. When I had my youngest 35 years ago, I was kept in hospital for 5 days, whereas Mum (almost the same number of years before that) was kept in ‘convalescence’ for 10 days. Times change.

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      1. Jacqui Murray

        It has been over 30 years since mine were born. Maybe thinking has changed! I had mine about 35 years ago also and in America. They sent us home day 2 (3 maybe?). Which was good. My husband was destroying the house!

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    1. Norah Post author

      I didn’t either, Robbie. When my last child was born (dare I say, 35 years ago) it was still frowned upon, but many shopping centres were starting (under pressure) to include a parenting room for breastfeeding mothers. They are quite common now, but many mothers feel it’s natural and have no need to hide themselves away, even in a parenting room. Good on them, I think. This particular mum really impressed me. She just stopped in her tracks and fed where she was standing. There was nothing brazen about it, just a total bubble of love.

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