Cacophony #flashfiction

This week at the Carrot Ranch, Charli Mills challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story, using cacophony. You can use the word or show discordant sound inaction. How can you create literary cacophony with your words? This one might be of interest to poets as a literary device. Go where the prompt leads!

If you’ve ever heard a flock of noisy corellas fly over, you’ll know the true meaning of the word ‘cacophony’.

If you haven’t, then here’s a taste.

But I was thinking that what might be a cacophony to one, might be music to another, for example the sound of children’s play and laughter. And that’s where I’ve gone with my response. I hope you like it.

Cacophony

Children’s voices rose from the street with excitement, until laughter exploded like fireworks, startling a flock of corellas into screeching flight.

Mrs Black in #4 slammed her door and windows tight, excluding the abhorrent noise daring to smother her favourite show.

Mr Judd from #5, pruning his grevilleas, shook his fist and said, “Stone the crows! What’s with all that racket?”

Mr Dredge in #7 dozed on, snoring in decibels way higher than those outside.

But Mrs Twigg in #3 flung wide her window, inhaling the children’s merriment that inspired memories of her own childhood antics so long ago.

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

44 thoughts on “Cacophony #flashfiction

  1. Doug Jacquier

    Great piece, Norah. Brought back wonderful memories of cracker nights before the wowsers took over. As for little corellas, they are a nightmare where I live in South Australia, especially in the summer months, when flocks of literally thousands fill the sky and drive us (even more) insane with cacophonic screeching.

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    1. Norah Post author

      I’m pleased you enjoyed it, Doug. Cracker Night – seems so long ago, but it was fun. Except if it wasn’t when you blew your thumb right off, which I think was one of the reasons for banning it, wasn’t it? The corellas are very noisy. Sometimes they sit in the trees near by and make some noise, but I think they’re mostly noisy as they fly over, which doesn’t usually last long.

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  2. Anne Goodwin is bringing Matilda Windsor home

    No, I’d never heard corellas before, never even heard of them. But I can see how they can be annoying.
    I love your flash. But it reminds me of a news story that really annoyed me a few years ago. People in a new housing estate near a school complained about the children’s noise at playtime and, although I can’t remember what it was, the school did something to quieten the children and reduce the noise. A ridiculous situation even if the houses were there first, but they weren’t. And, in this country, not everyone has gardens and some children have few opportunities apart from school to play outside.

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    1. Norah Post author

      That is a sad story, Anne. I guess I’ve never lived beside a school but I wouldn’t think children’s playground noise should be too annoying. It’s only for brief periods during the day and doesn’t occur at night or on the weekends. Schools are shut for a good part of the year too. But it could be difficult I guess for those with sensitive hearing or shift workers or mums with young babies. But I’m more inclinded to agree with you. Of course.

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  3. Pingback: Cacophony « Carrot Ranch Literary Community

    1. Norah Post author

      I love the birds! We have some beautiful songbirds here too. They all have their place, even if they don’t have beautiful voices. Or so I believe – it gives me hope for my own place. 😂
      I was wondering how I might work it into a picture book. I’m putting it on the back burner for now.
      I agree about Mrs Twigg.

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  4. Rebecca Glaessner Author

    Corellas are beautiful creatures! We get huge flocks flying around often. Gallahs too, and they’re just as noisy. But my Aussie heart loves it. I think I’m selective with my noise-acceptance too. Nature is encouraged. Human chaos, less so. Great piece Norah, I love the sound of kids playing, full of joy.

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    1. Norah Post author

      We have huge numbers of corellas too – and cockatoos and crows. It’s good when they all get together with the kookaburras and try to outdo each other. But, like you, I love the birds too. We have so many beautiful songbirds. I think there’s room for them all. At night, the flying foxes take over. They can be rather raucous too. But I agree with you about kids’ laughter. Pure joy!

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        1. Norah Post author

          What bats do you get? Our flying foxes are incredibly raucous when they are feeding on the fruits and nectar. But I agree, when they leave their trees for a night out, they are stunning. I’m sure they are when they return too, but I’ve never seen that. 🙂

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          1. Rebecca Glaessner Author

            I’ve never researched them before today but I think they’re fruit bats/flying foxes too! There’s a colony location within their 60km feeding range from where we live. It’s wonderful to learn they’re protected too, they’re special creatures, despite all the negativity surrounding bats. They’re mostly quiet from what I’ve seen, but we have two dogs who watch them in the trees when it gets dark and I’m late putting them to bed. But the bats stay safe from our fur babies (incl. the cats who are permanently indoors). When we own our own home, we’ll be building a native garden, full of fruits and flowers for the bats and bees and birds. And no nets! We dream of the day.

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            1. Norah Post author

              That day sounds wonderful, Rebecca. I hope you realise the dream soon.
              We have a bat colony about a kilometre from here. I look at the bats every time I leave the suburb. I haven’t heard many complaints recently, but I think their neighbours do well to put up with them. As you say, they are protected. But they smell and they can be noisy – almost silent in flight (if they’re up high enough) but noisy when feeding.
              Good on you for keeping your cats inside. I wish others would do the same.

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  5. Charli Mills

    Oh, dear! I started to listen to the corellas and now Mause added her own cacophony of barking because she doesn’t know what it is! I understand now what the children’s laughter and birds would sound like. I love Mrs Twigg’s response.

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    1. Norah Post author

      I’m sorry to do that to Mause – and to you! I think there are many Mrs Twiggs in our midst. What’s to not like about children’s laughter?

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