Tag Archives: Rhymes

Time for rhyme – Readilearn

Yesterday, 2 March was Dr Seuss’s birthday. How did you celebrate? Did you read a favourite Dr Seuss story – maybe even more than just one or two? Which is your favourite?

Children love the rhythmic, rhyming stories written by Theodor Seuss Geisel who was born in 1904. (A question for your children – how old would he be if he was still alive today?)

Having fun with rhyme is a great way for children to learn about the sounds of language.

In the beginning, the rhymes can be real or nonsense words, as are many employed by Dr Seuss, training the ear to hear. Children are delighted when they discover pairs of words that rhyme. It is great when parents and teachers share their excitement of discovery too.

Like those of Dr Seuss, many stories and poems for young children are written in rhyme. The rhyme is pleasant to the ear, and encourages children to join in with the reading or telling, using meaning and sound to predict the next rhyming word.

When children are ready, familiar rhyming texts are often the first they read independently, using a combination of memory and print. How many children do you know who first started reading with a Dr Seuss book; such as The Cat in the Hat, Fox in Socks, One Fish Two Fish, Ten Apples Up On Top, or any other favourite.

For my part in the celebration, I joined in with a challenge extended by Vivian Kirkfield to write a story in 50 words. The reason behind the 50 word challenge is that, although the total word count of Green Eggs and Ham is over 700, only 50 unique words were used. (Some of your children may like to check if that is so. How could they do it?)

I decided to write a rhyming nonsense story in exactly 50 words (title not included). I hope you and your children enjoy it.

Lucky Duck

Duck.

Old Duck.

Couldn’t see –

Lost his glasses by the tree.

Continue reading at: Time for rhyme – Readilearn

Anna’s pineapple

My gorgeous little granddaughter, Anna, turned two last Sunday.

This is a story I wrote for her in celebration of her big day.

It is based on a real event that occurred a week or two earlier. She just could not understand why her grandfather Bob had scoffed all the pineapple and left no more for her. He, of course, didn’t realise that the pineapple had been left for later, and thought that he was merely finishing off the leftovers.

Anna’s Aunty Beckii was most amused, as was the rest of the family,  that Bob had eaten it all as he had already earned the title of “Bob the scoffer” by Anna’s big brother Artie. I must add that Aunty Beckii and Uncle Glenn had both given Artie considerable encouragement in bestowing this title!

I am very grateful to Bernadette Drent who illustrated the story so well with only 2 days notice. I think she did a fantastic job and really captured the humour of the story.

Have a read and let me know what you think. I’d love to know if it deserves a readership wider than that of family members.