special days and events for classroom celebrations - July

Special Days and Events for Classroom Celebrations — July – #readilearn

As we step into the second half of 2020, I hope you continue to stay well and happy. So many changes occurred during the first half of the year and life has not yet returned, if it ever will, to how it once was. In some areas where change is required, that’s perhaps a good thing, but many of us mourn the freedoms and security we once enjoyed.

In this post, I list some days and events you may wish to celebrate with your children, whether at home or at school, hopeful that some may inspire you and renew your resolve to work towards a better future.

International Plastic Bag Free Day on 3 July is a great way to start the month focusing on the environment and making small steps towards a positive future. The aim of the day is to increase awareness of the harmful effects of plastic waste upon the environment, especially the marine environment, and encourage everyone to reduce their use of plastics.

Some things to think about and discuss:

  • More than 500 billion plastic bags are used around the world each year, about one million every minute.
  • Each plastic bag is used on average for less than half an hour.
  • Plastic bags remain in the environment for up to 500 years. Plastic pollution doesn’t just affect those of us alive today. It affects generations for hundreds of years to come.

If we can all reduce our use of plastics, especially single-use plastics, it will have a positive impact upon Earth’s future and the future of all its inhabitants, including plants, animals and humans.

What can you do?

Continue reading: Special Days and Events for Classroom Celebrations — July – readilearn

18 thoughts on “Special Days and Events for Classroom Celebrations — July – #readilearn

  1. Jules

    I haven’t quite finished yet but I am making a plarn (plastic yarn mat). I might keep it – as a guide for if and when I make more. I think I read it takes over 500 plastic bags to make a standard 3 by 6 foot mat (if I remembered the dimensions correctly). I know folks who have made sacks and even hats out of plarn. I do have a good supply of cloth bags, some I’ve had so long that I’ve repaired them with embroidery thread. 🙂

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    1. Norah Post author

      That’s a great use of plastic bags, Jules. I wouldn’t have enough plastic bags to make anything these days. I’ve been using reusables, including for fruit and vegetables, for over ten years now. There is still too much packaging on many items though.
      I like the word plarn. I hadn’t heard it before, but years ago my Mum made me a hat from plaited plastic bags so I suppose that’s similar. I remember wearing it to school one year on race day. It was my first race day at the school and they had a hat parade. Hats are always a big thing at the races. One of the competitions was for a bad taste hat and I thought my plaited plastic bag hat was perfect, especially when I added a few touches to it. Unfortunately, it didn’t go down very well at all. No one else did the bad taste thing – I didn’t realise it wasn’t a serious thing (I didn’t get the memo, as they say)- and it wasn’t appreciated. I was rather embarrassed and didn’t join in any more of their competitions.

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      1. Jules

        Before ‘lockdown’ grocery stores had collection bins for recycling plastic bags and one was (with permission) allowed to take whatever they wanted, especially if they had a good idea, like using the plarn to make a mat for the homeless. There are organizations that collect the finished mats and distribute them. Now of course that supply has be cut off because they don’t want any ‘transfer’. I think they are still collecting for the recycle (to burn) centers. But not for individuals. So I still have a good supply. And any plastic can be cut into strips – Some plastic is harder to work with, like the one that wraps tissue boxes, or some veggie bags like what carrots come in. You just have to make the first cut at a bit of an angle and go around in a circle (about an inch or two depending on the thickness of the plastic) and make a continuous plan strand for as long as you can and then you join the two plan pieces by just over lapping them. I crochet them. But I think there are other ways like just braiding or plating them and then sewing the strands together.

        It isn’t fun to be embarrassed as a child – one would have thought the adults would have been kinder and at least given you credit for the idea. I do remember trying a few times to get my folks to listen to things I’d written, but they were never really encouraging so I just stopped showing them. Tough when you don’t get support. But we grow strong and move on.

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        1. Norah Post author

          Thanks for all the extra information about using plarn, Jules. I admire your work in helping others.
          In the hat event I described I was a teacher at the school. It was difficult as a newcomer to be accepted into the existing cliques. Exclusion and ridicule is not only for children. But as you say, we grow strong and move on, and learn what not to do again.

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  2. Miriam Hurdle

    Second half of the year already? I can’t believe it. Oh no, the second half usually goes by faster with all the holidays and celebrations.

    This is an excellent post, Norah. I wish every day is plastic bag free day!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. petespringerauthor

    2020 has been a year I certainly won’t ever forget. Let’s hope that the second half is a bit calmer. I always found that elementary children loved to get involved in environmental causes.

    Liked by 1 person

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