classroom Christmas lessons and activities

Classroom Christmas lessons and activities – reblogged from readilearn

It’s almost Christmas again and here in Australia we’re on the countdown to the end of the school year and our long summer holidays. Whether you’ll be enjoying a long break or a shorter break over the festive season, here at readilearn we’ve got many ready-to-teach lessons and activities to support your teaching in the lead-up to Christmas.

Get an early start with these lessons and activities

You will get most benefit from some activities if you begin them a few weeks before the finish of term.

Friendship Trees, one of readilearn’s most popular Christmas activities is best begun three to four weeks before school closes for Christmas. Children make their own friendship trees which are then placed on display in the classroom.

Each day children write anonymous messages of affirmation or friendship to each other and place them in the trees. At the end of term, children take their trees home and read the positive messages contained within.

The trees help to develop self-esteem, confidence and friendship skills and are perfect for those last few weeks when temperatures soar and children can become edgy with excitement for the holidays.

A 3D Christmas tree makes a beautiful focal point of the classroom Christmas display. Children cooperatively construct the tree by contributing leaves made by tracing or printing their hands. It is a visible recognition of the value of teamwork and will be admired (and envied) by many. It makes a beautiful background for photographs of individual children to be given as gifts to parents or other loved ones.

Continue reading: Classroom Christmas lessons and activities – readilearn

27 thoughts on “Classroom Christmas lessons and activities – reblogged from readilearn

  1. Mabel Kwong

    This was such an informative piece to read about Christmas and the classroom, Norah. Growing up in Australia and Asia, how my school celebrated Christmas was by singing carols and passing around gifts like a Kris Kringle. I really like the idea of Friendship Trees. It really makes children more observing and thoughtful towards one another, and learn to see the best in others too. I also like that these wishing trees make you write handwritten note for each other – that is so personal 🙂

    The countdown calendar is a great idea too. Makes for something to look forward too. It reminds me of advent calendars which I have mixed feelings about – for most of them, you open a day for a prize when in reality, the experience of Christmas and spending time with each other is what matters.

    I like that most of the activities in the post is interactive. Nothing like having a good time with others around you this time of the year. Hope you are doing well, Norah 🙂

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    1. Norah Post author

      Hi Mabel, It’s lovely to hear from you. Thank you for popping over to read and comment. I’m pleased you enjoyed the post and consider the activities positive. I always try to create resources that will encourage friendship and positive attitudes. The children always enjoyed the friendship trees and I was always amazed at the personalised affirmations they wrote for each other. They are more perceptive than we sometimes give them credit for.
      I agree with you that spending time with each other is what is important at Christmas time. I hope you have a wonderful Christmas with family and friends.

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      1. Mabel Kwong

        It’s lovely stopping by, Norah. It’s great that you and others encourage children to develop friendships all the time in the classroom. It makes for more conducive learning. Wishing you a wonderful Christmas with the ones you love 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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        1. Norah Post author

          Thank you again, Mabel. I’ve received notification that you have posted too (I’ve missed your posts). I’ll be over to read as soon as I can.

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  2. LucciaGray

    I love this post! Friendship Tree is a fabulous idea. We had a huge wishing tree once at school where everyone added their Hopes and wishes for themselves and others anonymously. But this is a much better idea! I’ll send the link to my daughter who’s a great primary teacher!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks so much for your enthusiasm, Luccia. The wishing tree sounds like a lovely idea too. There are so many wonderful things we can do. As ‘they’ say, when you can choose to be anything, be kind. Let me know if your daughter is interested in having a look. 🙂

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  3. Patricia Tilton

    Wow! You have some really wonderful and fun Christmas activities. I think my favorite is the hand Christmas Tree — which you could actually use again for Valentines Day, Arbor Day and other special days. Love this meaningful tree!

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you so much for your additional thoughts about using the tree, Patricia. Yes, it could have so many more applications. My children and I always loved it. They took every chance to show it off to others and, as it was opposite my doorway and could be seen from the building’s foyer, there were many who came to admire it. 🎄

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Pete. It was always a very special part of the day for us. I was always impressed by the lovely, and individual, things children would think to write about others. Even the children who weren’t so popular had a tree full of lovely things written about them. There was never a nasty word written.

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