learning is fun with Halloween-themed activities

Learning with Halloween fun – readilearn

Halloween is just around the corner and many of us wonder how we can have fun with a Halloween theme while ensuring learning is not forgotten in repetitious and meaningless worksheets.

readilearn teaching resources support teachers in keeping the learning alive while the children are having fun with Halloween-themed lessons.

trick or treat printable game for Halloween

The printable Trick or Treat Game for Halloween is aΒ fun board game for two or more players of all ages, suitable for use in maths and literacy groups, with buddies or in family groups. It combines reading, mathematics, activity, and loads of fun and laughter.

Everything required to play the game is included in the zip folder. All you’ll need to add is a dice and a sense of fun. There are treats to collect and instructions to follow. Try not to be scared by those witches and ghosts and, most of all, look out for your friends.

The kit also includes additional ideas for lessons in maths and writing.

Each of the game components are also available individually to use in other ways if you wish.

Continue reading: Learning with Halloween fun – readilearn

21 thoughts on “Learning with Halloween fun – readilearn

  1. calmkate

    Must say I attended a local halloween party at a Balmain primary school … I’m converted what fun and creativity! Got some really great photos on my phone [didn’t take my camera] and no idea how to get them onto my computer …

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I’m pleased you enjoyed it, Kate. Fun and creativity are two of my favourite things. Do you use Google? Google photos will automatically sync photos on all your devices. I love it. Otherwise, I email them to myself and save them to my computer. Depending on how many you took, that could be arduous.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Patricia Tilton

    I wondered about how Halloween made its way to Australia. You really have some wonderful games and activities for kids. I’m impressed with your offerings to teachers and parents. And, the book I shared today may be one you’ll want to check out. It is more than just about the holiday.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks so much for your supportive comment, Patricia. I appreciate it. I look forward to checking out your post. I’ll get there soon. πŸ™‚

      Like

      Reply
  3. calmkate

    I’m totally unimpressed that we are adopting yankie traditions … it’s just another commercial cash cow!
    Am in Balmain on my way home and so many houses are ghoulishly decorated for Saturdays big festival … Sydney Harbour is putting on a show too. Guess we’ll need to stock up on sweets 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I appreciate your comment, Kate. I’m sure there are many who agree with your sentiment, especially about the commercialisation of the day. Although much of it has come to us through American television shows, and it’s certainly big there, the tradition dates back long before there were the United States and far away from there. It seems to me, that it is only another tradition that has been brought here by immigrants, like Christmas, Easter and St Patrick’s Day. Learning about it helps us appreciate each other and each other’s traditions. What I try to do with my lessons and teaching resources is ensure that the children are involved in learning as well as having fun and not just being kept busy with meaningless activities. I’ve never been one to celebrate it myself. It wasn’t around when I was a kid. The day for us had a religious significance. But now the young ones sure love dressing up and having fun. I think they love that more than the sweets.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
        1. Norah Post author

          We can all do with learning more. 🀣
          Halloween has quite a long history, This article has some great information. https://www.history.com/topics/halloween/history-of-halloween
          And last night when I was reading Carol Taylor’s blog, I found out that the words ‘trick or treat’ were first uttered in Canada. Who’d have thought. Here’s a link to her article. https://carolcooks2.com/2019/10/24/national-pumpkin-month-facts-trivia-and-allergy-friendly-mummy-bars/
          Enjoy!

          Liked by 2 people

          Reply
            1. Norah Post author

              You are welcome, Kate. I didn’t do much other than supply the link. It is quite interesting. So many of our festivals are based upon those from thousands of years ago. “We” just took the bits that appealed and adjusted them for our own purposes. That’s creativity for you! πŸ™‚

              Liked by 1 person

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