Spring into September with lots to celebrate

Spring into September with Lots to Celebrate – readilearn

The beginning of September marks the beginning of spring in the southern hemisphere and brings, along with it, many days to celebrate.

Wattle day

Here in Australia, we welcome Spring on 1 September with Wattle Day. The golden wattle is Australia’s national floral emblem.

You could celebrate Wattle Day by:

  • wearing a spray of wattle on your hat
  • writing a poem about wattle flowers and springtime
  • using yellow pom poms to make Happy Wattle Day cards to give to friends and loved ones
  • going for a walk around the school grounds or local neighbourhood to check out the wattle trees in bloom. With nearly one thousand species of wattle in Australia, you are sure to see a variety. Comparing tree bark, leaves and blossoms helps to develop the ability to identify the similarities and differences that support scientific classification.
  • investigating how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples use parts of the wattle tree; for example, for food, medicine, fuel, to make rope, fishing lines, string and tools such as boomerangs. Seasonal changes in the wattle trees indicate other changes that occur in the environment.

Father’s Day

This year, Father’s Day coincides with Wattle Day on 1 September. Father’s Day is a day to recognise the important role of fathers and other father figures. You can find suggestions for easy and inexpensive gifts in the Father’s Day resources, including a free list of Father’s Day Activities.

Continue reading: Spring into September with Lots to Celebrate – readilearn

35 thoughts on “Spring into September with Lots to Celebrate – readilearn

  1. Mabel Kwong

    So lovely you highlighted 1 September as Wattle Day. I think it’s such an underrated day. I really how bright yellow the wattle is and grown all around Australia – can be hard to miss this time of the year. Also indeed Father’s Day is this weekend in Australia. That said, growing up Father’s Day was always in June in Singapore and Malaysia. When I moved back to Australia, I found it a bit odd the day was in September 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Mabel. I’m pleased we celebrate the Wattle too. What a great day for all of us in Australia to celebrate – a beautiful symbol of our country.
      It would have been strange changing the date of Father’s Day. I hope you (and your father) adjusted okay. 🙂

      Like

      Reply
        1. Norah Post author

          I love the wattle in my back yard. I’m not surprised you didn’t adjust. It can be difficult at times. We’ve had our Labor Day and Queen’s birthday holidays changed up here a few times recently. It’s difficult getting used to it.

          Liked by 1 person

          Reply
      1. Jim Borden

        Good point, Norah. But I do have to get away from my U.S. centric view of the world! I jsut showed my students a list of the top ranked countries in the world, and we were not at the top. or even in the top five. We can learn a lot from other countries.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
  2. calmkate

    lol wattle is so lovely to look at but makes me sneeze prolifically … maybe I will write a poem about it!

    My father has been dead many years but I was pleased to see Bunnings stocking huge bunches of flowers, mostly sunflowers … how delightful 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I think you should write a poem about wattle. It must be difficult for you at this time of year if it makes you sneeze. It is so common.
      Yes, it’s great to see flowers out for Father’s Day. Sunflowers are such happy flowers.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Anne. I don’t think you have wattle over there. Not native anyway. There are some in Africa, but they are mostly native to Australia.

      Like

      Reply
  3. petespringerauthor

    Happy spring down under, Norah! Do teachers in Australia do Mother’s Day or Father’s Day projects with their students? It isn’t a requirement, but many teachers do in America. It was one of those gray areas for me because there were children who had no relationship with one of their parents due to various reasons. So sad!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Pete. Yes, teachers usually involve their classes in making cards and/or gifts for their parents on the special days. Some are finding ways to deal with them that are more inclusive of different family situations now. I think as teachers, we were probably always mindful of an individual child’s circumstances, and were probably discreet in dealing with it. Now the differences are made more public and need to handled in different ways.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.