School Days Reminiscences of Pete Springer

School Days, Reminiscences of Pete Springer

Welcome to the School Days, Reminiscences series in which my champion bloggers and authors share reminiscences of their school days. It’s my small way of thanking them for their support and of letting you know about their services and publications.

This week, I am pleased to introduce Pete Springer, teacher, author and blogger. Pete joined in these conversations about school days right from the beginning. Like me, he is a passionate educator and has spent many years in the classroom changing lives.

Although he is no longer in the classroom, his passion for education remains strong. He has established a Facebook page to support teachers and has written a book sharing his experience as a teacher with the intention of supporting other teachers, especially those just starting their journey.

He titled his book They Call Me Mom. What a fabulous title. As a teacher, I was called Mum (or even Dad, sometimes) many times. I always considered it a lovely testimony to our respectful relationship. As a parent, I was also sometimes called Mrs x and was just as honoured. I’m sure that, as you read through Pete’s bio and interview, you will be impressed by his ongoing contribution to education and our world.

But, before we get into Pete’s interview, I’ll allow him to tell you a little of himself:

I taught elementary school (grades 2-6) for thirty-one years in California.  I loved everything about being a teacher.  I loved my students as if they were my own, and I follow their progress today even though I’ve been retired for three years. I’ve been invited to many extracurricular events (I tried to attend one each for all of my students during the year), birthday, graduations, weddings, and even a housewarming party.  One of my funniest memories was being invited (I obviously didn’t go) to a sleepover party thrown by one of my second graders.

I don’t like to make a big deal about it, but I was chosen for the Excellence in Teaching Award in 2006. This award is presented annually to ten of the top teachers in the County each year.

My favorite thing to do in school on a daily basis was to read to kids, and I decided that if I ever got the opportunity that I would try writing books for children when I retired.  I got sidetracked by another project first.  I decided to write a combination memoir/advice book, They Call Me Mom for future teachers.  The title of the book was inspired by the fact that elementary children consistently refer to their teachers as mom (by accident).  I took this as the ultimate compliment because moms are pretty great! I have spoken to college students at my alma mater, Humboldt St. who are studying to become teachers.  I was most touched when one of my former Superintendents purchased my book for all of the new teachers in his district. 

I am now following my dream and attempting to write books for middle grades that deal with the issues that kids deal with at home and at school.  I’ve joined a critique group (one of the members is my former principal, Nancy Wheeler, who is one of my biggest role models in education serving as one of my master teachers and then as my principal.  (She is 81 and still volunteers in schools, and I couldn’t have a better role model.) My wife, Debbie, was also a career educator, serving as a preschool teacher and then Director.

In addition, as an advocate for literacy, I joined the Humboldt County Author’s Festival Committee which brings twenty-five children’s authors from across the country to our local schools biennially.  (I someday would love to be one of the presenters.)  I also volunteer for an organization called the Society for the Blind.  This organization helps people who are visually impaired. Once a week I read our local newspaper and send in the articles (using voice memos on my cellphone) where they can be accessed by those who are blind or have low vision. 

Having been a master teacher for four student teachers, I try to always be an advocate for education, children, and teachers.  I started a Facebook group about eighteen months ago called Supporters of Teachers to highlight positive things that are happening in education. 

They Call Me Mom by Pete Springer

Welcome, Pete.

Let’s talk about school. First, could you tell us where you attended school?

I attended school for thirteen years (K-12) in the United States.  I then attended Humboldt St. (California) where I graduated and went on to earn my teaching credential.

Did you attend a government, private or independent school?

All of the school I attended were government (public) schools.

What is the highest level of education you achieved?

The highest level of education I achieved was a Bachelor’s Degree from Humboldt St.

What work or profession did you choose after school and was there anything in school that influenced this choice?

I come from a family of teachers, but I think school also influenced my career path because I was inspired by some of the teachers I had. I never planned on becoming a teacher, but I fell into an education job as a one on one aid to a boy who had muscular dystrophy.  I fell in love with working with children from that moment on.

What is your earliest memory of school?

My earliest memory of school was attending preschool.  One of the other kids in the class ate a purple crayon and threw it up a few minutes later.  The poor teacher had to deal with the mess.

What memories do you have of learning to read?

What do you remember of learning to read, Pete Springer

I remember loving to read from an early age.  I was read to a lot when I was a child, and I developed an appreciation for books then. I remember reading all of the books in the Hardy Boys series when I was in elementary school.  One of my favorite things to do as a dad was to read with my own son who has gone on to earn his Master’s Degree in education. I still read every night before I go to bed.  John Grisham is my favorite author.

What memories do you have of learning to write?

I recall writing stories at a young age.  When I got to high school I became much more self-conscious about having my work read aloud.  When I became a teacher, I often wrote plays that my class and I performed.

What do you remember about math classes?

Math came easy to me.  I was always good with numbers and teachers were very impressed with my mental math abilities.  Math was such an intuitive concept to me—I loved it until geometry reared its ugly head.

What was your favourite subject?

What was your favourite subject, Pete Springer

I liked pretty much all subjects, but I would say math because It made me feel smart.

What did you like best about school?

I liked the elementary and middle school years because I had a lot of friends.  High school was my least favorite time. I would say that college was my happiest time because I could be myself, and I liked the opportunity for free thinking.

What did you like least about school?

My least favorite thing about school was my high school years because it was so cliquish.  We moved to a new place when I was starting high school, and I didn’t have the self-confidence that I possess today.  I tended to withdraw instead of putting myself out there. If I could have one do-over in my life, it would be those years because it was the one time in my life that I wasn’t happy.

How do you think schools have changed since your school days?

Pete Springer on how schools have changed

I think I’m very qualified to answer questions about schools.  One way that schools have changed today is the greater emphasis on technology.  I certainly am a proponent of the basics, but you have to play to your audience as well.  Kids love technology, and we live in a technological society.  Another change is the great emphasis that schools put on state testing.  That is quite unfortunate because it takes the joy out of learning for students and teachers.  While there are always going to be great kids in a school, there is a higher percentage of students with anger and mental health issues.  It makes the job harder to be a teacher and a student in a hostile environment.

What do you think schools (in general) do well?

I think schools generally give kids a well-rounded education.  One of the things schools are getting better at recognizing is that not every student is bound for college.  They are providing a path for students who will learn a trade.  There are still plenty of educators who recognize how important it is to keep the arts alive in schools, but I worry about cuts in this area.

How do you think schools could be improved?

Pete Springer on how schools could be improved

Besides de-emphasizing state testing, schools have an increasingly challenging job of dealing with bullying.  Violence is prevalent in our culture, and schools have increasing numbers of violent students who are dealing with mental health issues. The school has to be a safe place for kids; a place that they can learn in a nonthreatening environment with role models who inspire them.  Teaching educators how to equip themselves with firearms is not the answer!

 

thank you for your participation

Thank you for sharing your reminiscences of school and thoughts about education in general, Pete. It’s been wonderful to have you here. I always love meeting other educators, especially those who are as passionate about children and learning as I am. I don’t think anyone who hasn’t been a teacher can ever understand the passion and dedication we have for our roles as life changers.

Find out more about Pete Springer

on his blog:  Pete Springer Author

Connect with him on social media

Facebook: Pete Springer Author

Twitter: Pete Springer

They Call Me Mom by Pete Springer

Purchase your own copy of They Call Me Mom

from Amazon

If you missed previous reminiscences, check them out here:

Charli Mills

Sally Cronin

Anne Goodwin

Geoff Le Pard

Hugh Roberts

Debby Gies

Pauline King

JulesPaige

D. Avery

Christy Birmingham

Miriam Hurdle

Robbie Cheadle

Marsha Ingrao

Ritu Bhathal

Joy Lennick

Darlene Foster

Susan Scott

Barbara Vitelli

Sherri Matthews

Mabel Kwong

Chelsea Owens

Carol Taylor

Pamela Wight

Look for future interviews in this series to be posted on Sunday evenings AEST.
Coming soon:

Yvette Prior

Colleen Chesebro

Balroop Singh

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your comments. Please share your thoughts.

 

120 thoughts on “School Days, Reminiscences of Pete Springer

  1. Pingback: School Days, Reminiscences — the first 25 | Norah Colvin

  2. Jennie

    I thoroughly enjoyed this interview! Pete is a favorite blogger and excellent educator (and person). What he says about schools is absolutely true. Testing and bullying are big concerns in schools. While I agree with embracing technology, it is being done at the preschool level. Three year olds need to learn social and emotional skills first. Pete’s passion rings throughout this interview. Thank you, Norah!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Pete’s post is full of wisdom for teachers and anyone involved with education. Little ones do need to learn those social and emotional skills first. Getting along with others is so important. Thank you for your lovely comment, Jennie.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. Pingback: School Days, Reminiscences of Balroop Singh | Norah Colvin

  4. Miriam Hurdle

    Hi Pete, what a great pleasure to read more about you. Thank you for connecting with me early on. I’m proud of your achievement and receiving the award in 2006. High school is such a critical years for young people to build their confidence and academic success. I’m sorry the cliquish environment left you unhappy in high school. It must have taken a great deal for you to overcome it and move on to university.

    I had many kids call me “mom” also. It made me feel good though. I’m so glad you wrote your book about it. I encountered all the issues you mentioned in this post, the violence, mental problem of students, bullying, and more. I think the family problems resulting lack of home support are part of the cause.

    I used to say I’m the mom and teacher to the students.

    Liked by 1 person

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  5. Bruce

    Thoroughly enjoyed the interview with Pete, although I wonder how his high school years could be his unhappiest as he consistently took our money at poker games! And like you Pete, I’m one of those rare people who like math (being an engineer) and writing (being a struggling self-published author). I’m happy to see you get the recognition you deserve as an outstanding teacher and person, and a promising blogger and author. They Call Me Mom was a wonderful book!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks for your wonderful comment in support of Pete, Bruce. You have obviously known, and admired, him longer than I have. I’m looking forward to reading his book.

      Like

      Reply
  6. D. Wallace Peach

    It’s so funny to me how the “purple crayon incident” was the earliest memory of school. Makes total sense, but… And I agree with Pete that our violet culture poses a real threat to school kids and learning, and more violence/guns is never the answer. I wish all teachers out there a safe, happy, and exciting school year.

    Liked by 1 person

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  7. petespringerauthor

    Reblogged this on Pete Springer and commented:
    Many thanks to educator, Norah Colvin, for allowing me to participate in her outstanding weekly feature, School Days Reminiscences. I’m so appreciative of not only her support of me but to the entire field of education.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks so much for sharing with your readers, Pete. You haven’t got your comments turned on over there, so I’ve had to comment here. 🙂

      Like

      Reply
  8. robbiesinspiration

    How lovely to learn more about Pete, who I met on the blog fairly recently. I am most admiring of teachers, as you know, Norah. I am glad to know that in the US they recognise that all students can’t be university material and academics. That is not the case in South Africa. Every child aspires to university whether they have the aptitude or not and it causes a real problem.

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. Norah Post author

      I’m pleased you enjoyed learning a little more about Pete, Robbie. I think it is important for us to accept that there are many different aptitudes and ambitions. University is not the only path to success in life.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
    2. petespringerauthor

      I’m also please to have met you, Robbie. You are one of the hardest working bloggers out there and yet you always find the time to respond to other’s comments.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  9. Patricia Tilton

    What a fascinating teaching career. You can tell that Pete loves kids and the kids love him. Good to know that schools are recognizing that college isn’t for every student and helping them find their passions in other areas. Such an inspiring interview.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      The old juices get going this time of year for me, Patricia. While I miss it, I also love the independence that retirement allows. I have several former students who became teachers (one in my elementary school) and that is a source of great pride.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  10. petespringerauthor

    Okay, I promise this is my last comment to you because I don’t want to hijack Nora’s blog any more. I understand that administrators feel pressure to raise test scores, but that angst gets projected onto teachers who then, may in turn, stress out their students.

    Reading to kids is the best! It’s so much fun to read to an engaged audience. Yes, you are a celebrity to them. My dream is to someday read one of my children’s books to my future grandchild. It’s time for my son to get busy and meet a good woman. Ha-ha!

    Like

    Reply
  11. Susan Scott

    Thanks for this Norah and Pete, and I was pleased to see you recognition Pete of mental health and anger issues that students seem to have; also your comment Pete that we have a responsibility to the next generation. Congratulations on your past history and deserved rewards, and may the future continue to blessed with your knowledge and love of passing it on.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      I appreciate your comments, Susan. After taking a look at your blog, I am quite interested in learning more about the We are the World Blogfest. For all of the crap that takes place in the world, I always like to remind myself of all of the good people who are doing good deeds. I’d love to take part in that next month.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  12. Prior...

    great interview with Pete Springer and the purple crayon memory – yikes.
    Top takeaway was good to read – that he felt schools were
    “getting better at recognizing”. ” that not every student is bound for college. They are providing a path for students who will learn a trade.”
    and cheers to Pete for dedicating his life’s work to teaching and investing in others in that frontline role

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      I just checked out your blog. Thanks for your contributions to the educational world. It never ceases to amaze me how many giving people there are in that field.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
      1. Prior...

        thanks for checking out my blog – and I must admit by about page is not the best – oh well – and side note – I was just going through some of my son’s old high school work and tossed most – took pictures of some – and what really stood out to me were the teacher comments.
        Seriously – I read some of them and was (again) reminded at how teachers build into students and the impact is long lasting (so keep remembering that as you do what do – touching lives in small ways every day – (one of the most powerful jobs in the world)

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
    2. Norah Post author

      I agree, Yvette. That purple crayon incident is one I’m pleased to have avoided.
      Pete has lots of wisdom to share about education. It is great that we have wonderful teachers like him and that he is sharing his wisdom with a younger generation of teachers too.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  13. Amy M Reade

    Fantastic interview, Pete and Norah. It sounds like Pete’s students were lucky kids to have someone who cared so much about them. And what a great title for a book written for teachers. It seems a perfect way to welcome them to a life of teaching.

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks for your lovely comment for Pete, Amy. I agree with you about the title of his book. I think it focuses on the positive relationships that need to be developed between teacher and students.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    2. petespringerauthor

      Thanks, Amy. The teacher/student relationship is mutually beneficial. I get so much back from my students, and I will treasure my relationships with them for life.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  14. Jules

    Pete and Norah,

    Another delightful post with great take-aways for dealing with teaching and living everyday.
    I was a pre-school teacher in what seems like another life… That helped me in raising my own children and then helping out with my grands. I always taught my children to be aware of the similarities of others. Both of my children were aides in school to differently-abled students and I think that has helped them as adults when dealing with everyone, including other adults.

    Continued success!

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      So pleased to read your comment. As if I didn’t already believe it, my wife (former preschool teacher and director) was always a proponent of early childhood education.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  15. roughwighting

    Hi Pete! Not sure how I’ve missed you all my years of blogging, but thanks to the incredible Norah, I now am familiar with another wonderful blogger/writer/teacher. I enjoyed every part of this interview. Congrats on the “Excellence in Teaching” award – I know you’re proud of it (as you should be) and I know you’re humble about it, but I think teachers need to get more recognition like this. The work they do is the MOST IMPORTANT job in our society. Period. Your book sounds fabulous (I’m off to get it) and I look forward to your middle-grade books when you are ready to publish it. I’m also off to check the County Author’s Festival Committee. I lived in Marin County for 20 years, and will be giving a presentation about writing/publishing children’s books at one of their libraries in December. Now I’m realizing it would be fun to attend children’s book festivals as well. And lastly, yes, the state testing is frustrating. I understand the need for testing, but I think a lot more work needs to be done to find a test that is fair to all students, and that doesn’t encourage (ie, make) educators “teach to the test.” I worked for ten years in the special ed department of a Boston-area high school, and the test taking was inordinately stressful for teachers AND students.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      Thank you for taking the time to write such a thoughtful post, Pam. First, let me say that I completely agree with you about Norah—she is awesome! I’ve always found that the fraternity of educators to be supportive and helpful to one another. Norah is no exception.

      I’ve only been at this for a few months, so it’s not that surprising that we haven’t crossed paths before. It has been a lot of fun for me to get to know fellow bloggers.

      I had my humble beginnings in special education, an area that requires so much patience. Thank you for your efforts in that area. I felt it was borderline cruel that special education students were forced to take those tests. All I cared about was that they survived that awful experience with their self-esteem in tact. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to realize that making this mandatory for them is wrong!

      Much luck to you with your presentation at the library in Marin County. I’m excited to learn from the authors who are coming to our area in October. When I taught, there was nothing quite like Author’s Day at my school. I felt like future authors were being born the moment an author was talking to the kids about writing his/her book. So exciting!

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
      1. roughwighting

        Um . . . I feel like we could continue this conversation forever (sorry, Norah!) First, yes I worked with high school SPED students and the testing was extremely stressful for them; we teachers/tutors were also pressured to make sure the students did well (so the results wouldn’t bring down the school’s ‘numbers,’ but we would be fired if we helped them out too much.
        On a positive side, I’ve read my first illustrated children’s book to many elementary classes, and seeing the amazed expressions on the students’ faces (a REAL author, HERE) and then having them ask me for my “autograph” as if I was a celebrity – made my day/week/month. ❤

        Liked by 2 people

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        1. petespringerauthor

          Okay, I promise this is my last comment to you because I don’t want to hijack Nora’s blog any more. I understand that administrators feel pressure to raise test scores, but that angst gets projected onto teachers who then, may in turn, stress out their students.

          Reading to kids is the best! It’s so much fun to read to an engaged audience. Yes, you are a celebrity to them. My dream is to someday read one of my children’s books to my future grandchild. It’s time for son to get busy and meet a good woman. Ha-ha!

          Liked by 1 person

          Reply
        2. Norah Post author

          No apology necessary, Pamela. I’m happy for the conversation to continue and run it’s natural course, as long as you don’t mind my eavesdropping. 😂
          Authors are celebrities. You are a celebrity. I wish you could read to me. I’d get your autograph for sure. 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

          Reply
      2. Norah Post author

        I’m so pleased you and Pam have met up, Pete. You have much in common.
        Sometimes those future authors that were being born during the author talks weren’t only in the student ranks, eh?

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
  16. Book Club Mom

    Hello Norah and Pete! Great to learn more about you, Pete and your teaching career. It sounds as if you were destined to be a teacher and congratulations on all the success you earned in the classroom. I remember calling my teacher “Mom” by mistake and I know my children did the same. As for Geometry – its ugly head was very present for me too! I also agree with you about state testing. It was out of control where I live, but now there is less emphasis on “teaching the test” than there was when my children were in elementary school. It certainly took away the fun of learning. Great interview!

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      Success in the classroom should not be about teachers winning awards. The biggest reward for me has been watching former students grow up and do amazing things in their lives. Very nice to meet you.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  17. petespringerauthor

    It breaks my heart to hear that anyone had a ‘dismal’ education, Joy. School should embrace creativity and acceptance of others.

    I want you to know that I thoroughly enjoyed reading some of your posts on Sally’s Smorgasbord blog. You’ve had the most interesting life!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  18. dgkaye

    Wonderful reading about Pete here and his continuation of wanting to educate children by writing books. Teachers like Pete are the gift that keeps on giving. And I can so identify with those high school cliques which I had no interest of being part of. Great interview Pete and Norah. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      Thank you, Debby, for your nice comment. I’ve been on the road the last few days, but guess what book I’ve been reading? Well, how are you supposed to know that, so I’ll just tell you. It’s Conflicted Hearts—a book I’m really enjoying.

      Pleased to have met you along with such a wonderful community of bloggers in the past six months. By the way, quit trying to sneak your overweight bags on to the airplane. Ha-ha!

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      Aw, that’s such a wonderful thing to say. I worked with so many fine teachers over the years who made me feel proud to be part of such an awesome profession.

      Liked by 2 people

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  19. petespringerauthor

    Thank you so much, Norah. I never miss this Sunday feature because I find everyone’s educational experiences so interesting. I was coming home from a trip today, or I would have responded sooner. I am grateful to have been introduced to so many outstanding bloggers (such as yourself) from around the world in the last several months.

    I have noticed that while we all come from different backgrounds, there are common threads that we can all relate to. Students want to first feel safe and cared for by their teachers. An inspired student has the potential to do amazing things in his/her community and grow into a leader.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Pete, thank you so much for participating in this series, first as commenter, then as interviewee. You have added so much wisdom and joy to the conversation about education. It wouldn’t be the same without your input.
      I agree with you that the first thing students want is to feel safe and cared for. Establishing a welcoming and supportive classroom was always my priority. If I felt happy there, I knew the children would, and vice versa. It is our responsibility to help develop positive leaders of the future.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. petespringerauthor

        I think part of my love for the vocation stems from the fact that there are so many good people in education. We do feed off each other’s positive energy. Thank you for being part of this noble profession, Norah, and for helping to raise a whole new generation of future leaders.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. Norah Post author

          There are many good people in education, Pete. I always love being a part of it. It’s so important. Thank you for your contribution in making a positive difference to our world.

          Liked by 1 person

          Reply
  20. Christy B

    Pete is not only leaving a legacy as a great teacher but also continuing to inspire people with his book and positive way of living. We connected by our blogs earlier in the year and I am so pleased to know someone as thoughful and intelligent as him! Terrific interview and great choice in your interviewee today, Norah x

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      Thanks for your sweet comment, Christy, and for being a champion for women around the globe. I appreciate all of the wonderful content that you put out on a weekly basis.

      Liked by 2 people

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    1. petespringerauthor

      It was very nice to read your comments, Darlene. I feel we all have a responsibility to the next generation.

      I think I’m in the minority when it comes to liking math. I’ve noticed that many of the others who’ve been interviewed have preferred reading and writing over math. One positive change I saw during my career was that many more girls were becoming interested in science.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
      1. Norah Post author

        I wonder if the seeming dislike of maths skewed as there have been more female interviewees. Anne Goodwin shares a love of maths. I see a lot of beauty in it and believe it could be a lot more fun if it was taught better. It is all around us after all and we use it every day in many different ways. Often we just don’t realise it, as we think it’s all to do with adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing, but it’s much more than that.

        Liked by 3 people

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        1. Darlene

          I didn’t dislike math and always got good marks, but it wasn’t my favourite. Funny enough, I loved Algebra and the rest of the class hated it. I liked that it made you think and use deductive reasoning.

          Liked by 2 people

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    1. petespringerauthor

      Nice to meet a fellow educator, Beth. All teachers have been called ‘mom’ before, especially the ones who teach elementary school. In fact, I was referred to as ‘mom’ more than ‘dad’. I’m not sure what to make of that. Ha-ha! I found it quite amusing when one of my students called me ‘grandma’. Okay, let’s not take this mom thing too far.

      Liked by 3 people

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    1. petespringerauthor

      Thank you for your comment, Dr. Andrea. Much luck to you with your school year. It doesn’t matter what level one is teaching at—we all have the opportunity to inspire our students. Some of my best instructors were college professors.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
  21. Ritu

    Here we go! Found a maths lover!
    And yeah, I agree, Pete, with your comment about more angry kids and those with MH issues… Compulsory testing doesn’t help them. In fact, I think it makes situations worse. And yup. Sucks the fun outta learning(and teaching)!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. petespringerauthor

      We’re a rare breed, Ritu. I haven’t met too many people who enjoy writing and math. I suppose because writing is more of a creative pursuit while math tends to appeal more to the left-brained analytical types. Not sure what happened to me? Thanks for putting out such a positive blog with a healthy dose of humor.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  22. joylennick

    Hi Norah,
    I would love to have had Pete as one of my teachers…He sounds ‘spot on.’
    As you know (yes I was put through the wringer too…) I had a dismal education – although met kindness from my teachers. All except one: my maths teacher in college, who had NO patience with slow children….English was more to my liking. But, generally speaking, I think most teachers need a large medal! Best wishes. x

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply

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