celebrating 100 days of school with lessons ready to teach readilearn

Celebrating 100 days of school with lessons ready to teach – readilearn

Celebrating 100 days of school is a wonderful opportunity for acknowledging the passage of time, learning progress and a growing understanding of number. Children love a party and there can be nothing better than a celebration to increase their motivation and get them all involved.

As the school year in Australia consists of approximately 200 days, the 100th day occurs close to the half-way mark. While it is fun to count up to 100, it can also be fun to count back from 100 to know how many more school days remain in the year.

Celebrate 100 days

Several readilearn resources with lessons ready to teach support you and your students as you count up to and celebrate one hundred days, including:

Whether you’ve used it from the beginning of the year or not, the interactive digital resource Busy Bees 100 chart is great for all your usual number board activities and can be used to keep a count of how many days you’ve been at school. Simply display the resource on the whiteboard at the beginning of each day and move the bee to the next number. The chart also helps to develop a visual idea of what 100 objects look like.

Each of these next three resources can be accessed individually or through the Busy Bees 100 chart.

Continue reading: Celebrating 100 days of school with lessons ready to teach – readilearn

10 thoughts on “Celebrating 100 days of school with lessons ready to teach – readilearn

    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks, Patricia. Schools are just closing for the mid-year break. It usually two weeks for most schools though some private schools break for three.
      I guess it is like an advent calendar – just longer. 🙂

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  1. CarolCooks2

    Thailand has about 180 school days with one day a week usually Wednesday dedicated to the scout movement. The schools are open 7 days a week as there are many children who have extra lessons 🙂

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    1. Norah Post author

      Wow, that’s interesting, Carol. I haven’t heard of days being dedicated to the scout movement anywhere else. Is the usual school week 5 days? Do the schools just open on the weekend for additional lessons? One hundred and eighty days is approximately half the number of days in the school year. Australia’s 200 days is an additional four weeks of school a year. It would be good if it showed in the results.

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      1. CarolCooks2

        As far as I am aware weekends are additional lessons and the scout movement maybe other Asian countries do the same I will check that out …Aston attends 5 days on the weekend we pay for external private lessons where he is taught by ability not just taught en masse as per the schools…Here they have long holidays and a few Buddha days as well…many children like Aston have external private lessons on the weekend …

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  2. petespringerauthor

    Lots of teachers celebrate the 100th day of school in the United States. One of the more common activities is to invite the students to bring in one hundred of something (often from a hobby but sometimes a food) that they want to share with the class. I was interested to learn that a typical school year in Australia is approximately 200 days. It has been 180 days for us for quite a few years, (but that doesn’t include all of the days teachers spend at school on the weekends and in the summer.)

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks for your comment and sharing your experiences, Pete. Yes, I used to get children to bring in 100 items from home. They would collage them and we’d display them in the room. It’s one of the suggestions I shared in the resources.
      The differences in number of days in the school year from country to country is interesting, Pete. Australia has more than either the US or UK. And you’re right, teachers everywhere work a lot more than the 180 or 200 school days. I’ve always said that the holidays are to make up (partially) for all the overtime they do during the term and on the ‘holidays’ too. I’m quite convinced if it was worked out on an hourly basis, we’d still be owed time. 🙂

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