School Days Reminiscences of Robbie Cheadle

School Days, Reminiscences of Robbie Cheadle

Welcome to the School Days, Reminiscences series in which my champion bloggers and authors share reminiscences of their school days. It’s my small way of thanking them for their support and of letting you know about their services and publications.

This week, I am pleased to introduce Robbie Cheadle, author, poet and blogger. I’m not sure when or where I first met Robbie, but I know was captivated by her delightfully unique Sir Chocolate series of picture books which she illustrates with amazing fondant figurines. I was also intrigued to know that these books were jointly written with her and her son Michael, starting from when he was ten years old. There are now six books in the Sir Chocolate series and, since then, Robbie has published a memoir of her mother’s war-time childhood, co-written a book of poems, and had others of her poems and short stories featured in anthologies.

Robbie Cheadle and her books

Before we begin the interview, I asked Robbie to tell you a little of herself:

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with six published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. 

Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

Robbie has also recently published a poetry collection, Open a new door, together with fellow South African poet, Kim Blades.

Welcome, Robbie.

Let’s talk school. First, could you tell us where you attended school?

I went to fourteen different schools as we moved around a lot. My first school was Craighall Convent in Johannesburg. The school I learned the most at was a bilingual school in George in the Western Cape. I was only there for six weeks but I learned the basics of Afrikaans (second language in South Africa) which I had missed out on before.

Did you attend a government, private or independent school?

I attended a mixture of schools. I attended a couple of private schools when I was in primary school including two convents. I went to public schools when we lived in George for the first time and when we lived in Cape Town. I attended a public high school in Johannesburg.

What is the highest level of education you achieved?

I have a degree and an honours degree in Accounting as well as my board examinations to become a chartered accountant. I was keen to do an economics degree a few years ago when I wrote my publications on direct foreign investment into Africa but I couldn’t find anything suitable. I reverted to self-study and analysis instead and this research is in my publications.

What work or profession did you choose after school and was there anything in school that influenced this choice?

Immediately after school I went to a secretarial college for a year where I learned typing, shorthand and the other skills of a professional secretary. I then worked for a few years and saved money which I used to pay for some of my university education. I attended a correspondence university and worked shifts in a video shop to earn money while I did my first degree. I applied for, and was accepted, for an internship at KPMG in Johannesburg when I finished my degree. KPMG paid for my studies for my honours degree and I studied part time in the evenings and during public holidays and weekends. It was hard but I managed to do it and I passed all my examinations first time around, even my honours degree where I had to pass all nine examinations in one sitting.

What is your earliest memory of school?

Robbie Cheadle as a school girl in the news

I remember having my photograph taken for the national newspaper on the first day of school. My friend’s father was a photographer for the newspaper and he used me as his “First day of school” photograph that year.

I also remember being left out when the girls (aged 7 years old) when to mass and practiced for their first Holy Communion. I recall being sad that I didn’t have a long white dress and candle. I only took my Holy Communion when I was 12 years old and we were living in George.

What memories do you have of learning to read?

I remember being fascinated with books and reading. I can recall sounding out the words by myself and the triumph of reading Little Bear all by myself. Once I got the hang of reading, I just went from strength to strength. I got books for every birthday and Christmas and belonged to the library. When I was 9 years old and we lived in Cape Town, I used to cycle to the library twice a week and take out 7 books at a time to read (4 library cards were mine and 3 were my sister, Cath’s, but she let me use them.)

What memories do you have of learning to write?

I remember writing my name in my books and I always inverted by b’s, d’s and p’s. I had a bit of remedial help and this was corrected when I was 8 years old. My old books still have the inscription Roderta Eaton.

What do you remember about math classes?

I have very little memory of maths class other than I was able to do reasonably well without much effort which left me lots of time to read. I remember my high school maths teacher writing a remark on my report that said: “Generally speaking, Robbie is generally speaking.” I have always remembered that comment. I had one teacher that told my mom that I had layers like an onion which you needed to peel back to find the real me. My mother was also told by a teacher that I practiced “silent insubordination.”

Robbie Cheadle discusses what she liked best about school

What was your favourite subject?

I enjoyed English firstly and then History. Accounting and Maths were both relatively easy for me and I hated Afrikaans with a passion. My second ever Afrikaans teacher embarrassed me in front of the whole class and I would never bother with learning this language after that.

What did you like best about school?

I have two lovely memories of school, one, was creating a play with my friends to perform for the class when I was 8 years old. I loved organizing the cast and teaching them their roles. I have always enjoyed project management and organizing. The other memory I cherish was being chosen to be Mary in the Nativity Play when I was 12-years old. I was simply thrilled.

What did you like least about school?

I can’t think of anything I really didn’t like about school; it just was something I did every day for 12 years. I have always been a loner and would always chose books over people. We moved a lot, so I learned not to get too close to other children, it was easier to uproot myself that way. I am still quite good at accepting change and I don’t retain long-term physical friendships. I prefer my virtual friends who are constant and always there.

How do you think schools have changed since your school days?

Unfortunately, the quality of the public education in South Africa for underprivileged children has not improved much since 1994. Lots of children start learning English late in their school career (at the age of 10 or 11 years old) and it is difficult for them to cope with being taught in English.

There is still a huge shortage of school basics in many rural schools and children are still being taught under trees and in classes with few desks and chairs and even fewer learning materials. There are often no proper toilets for the children to use.

I belong to charities which donate books and stationery to underprivileged schools. A lot is done to help by the private business sector and individuals.

My sons both attend private schools and the college my older son attends is exemplary in its out-reach programme. It supports a disadvantaged college in a rural area and has a programme to train teachers from disadvantaged backgrounds. It also has a programme to help disadvantaged children with potential to achieve at school. This is run in the afternoons and the teaching staff freely give of the own time and skills. It is a sad that the public education is poor because our world is evolving into one where higher-level skills are becoming vital to get and retain jobs. English and maths skills are essential.

What do you think schools (in general) do well?

I can only answer this question from the point of view of my own sons. Both of their schools have outcomes-based education programmes and this works so well. Their curriculums are marvelous and I often find myself thinking how much I would have enjoyed their schooling when I was a girl. My older son’s school has programmes to give accelerated learning opportunities to boys who find learning easier and support programmes for boys that find some areas of learning more difficult. They just do such wonderful things, read fantastic books and have marvelous learning opportunities. Of course, as with all things in life, you have to grasp opportunities or else they pass you by.

How do you think schools could be improved?

The most important thing in our government schools is to get good teachers. Teachers that aren’t masters in their subject will struggle to teach others, particularly, children that can’t learn in one specific way but need the information presented in another way. The children also need a safe learning environment, which often isn’t the case, and basic learning materials.

thank you for your participation

Thank you for sharing your reminiscences of school and thoughts about education in general, Robbie. It was interesting to hear the comparisons between your own schooling and that of your son’s current schooling. I was interested to hear your response to learning Afrikaans and was surprised at how late English was taught. The photographs of you from the newspaper are very cute and to be treasured.

Find out more about Robbie Cheadle on her blogs

Bake and Write

Robbie’s inspiration

And her Goodreads author page:

 

Connect with her on social media

Facebook @SirChocolateBooks

Roberta Writes

Twitter @bakeandwrite

@robertaeaton17

Robbie’s books can be purchased from

Amazon

Or

TSL Publications

If you missed previous reminiscences, check them out here:

Charli Mills

Sally Cronin

Anne Goodwin

Geoff Le Pard

Hugh Roberts

Debby Gies

Pauline King

JulesPaige

D. Avery

Christy Birmingham

Miriam Hurdle

Look for future interviews in this series to be posted on Sunday evenings AEST.

Coming soon:

Marsha Ingrao

Ritu Bhathal

Joy Lennick

Susan Scott

Mabel Kwong

Sherri Matthews

Chelsea Owens

Pete Springer

with more to follow.

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your comments. Please share your thoughts.

 

194 thoughts on “School Days, Reminiscences of Robbie Cheadle

  1. Pingback: School Days, Reminiscences of Barbara Vitelli | Norah Colvin

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  4. Pingback: School Days, Reminiscences of Joy Lennick | Norah Colvin

  5. Jane Risdon

    Loved this, love you got books for Christmas and birthdays, as I did. I give them to those I know will read. I too went to a mixture of Private and Public schools and being an Army family, I too have attended more schools than is helpful to one’s education. All that experience is fabulous, however, and makes for a more rounded person. It helps with writing too. Thanks so much, this is fab.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for reading and commenting, Jane. It’s interesting to note the things that you and Robbie have in common. How wonderful to be grateful for varied experiences for their contribution to writing. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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  6. Christy B

    I love that Robbie got books every Christmas and birthday. I think books make awesome presents and hope they’re not overlooked when it comes to gift giving occasions these days 🙂 Terrific interview between 2 of my favourite ladies!

    Liked by 2 people

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  7. Pingback: School Days, Reminiscences of Ritu Bhathal | Norah Colvin

  8. Pingback: School Days, Reminiscences of Marsha Ingrao | Norah Colvin

  9. Hugh's Views and News

    My goodness, so many schools in so little time. I don’t know how you coped moving from one school to another so much, Robbie. As a shy child, I would never have dealt with having to make new friends, but that could be because I’m more of an introvert.
    You’ve done so well and achieved so much since leaving school, Robbie. The government school system in South Africa sounds poor. It breaks my heart to hear that some school children don’t even have proper toilet facilities when at school. I only wish more could be done, but it’s great to hear that you belong to an organisation that donates books and other school equipment to schools.

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks for adding your lovely words to Robbie’s post, Hugh. Robbie has done very well and the contribution she is making to the lives of others is marvellous.

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  10. Anne Goodwin (Annecdotist)

    Gosh, Robbie, fourteen schools needs a lot of adjustment! Glad your education didn’t suffer.
    I’m glad you mentioned the issue with toilets in rural schools which can be such a problem in some parts of the world, especially for girls when they are menstruating or simply don’t feel comfortable going in the bushes. One of the reasons I support World Toilet Day in November.

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      I have not heard of world toilet day, Anne, that is interesting. I am one of the leaders of our work team’s corporate citizenship programme. One of our fund raisers is aimed at buying sanitary towels for girls who can’t afford to buy it and often miss school as a result. I am glad you enjoyed the article.

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  11. jjspina

    It’s lovely to learn more about multi-talented, Robbie Cheadle, and how dedicated she is to her sons’ education. It’s good to know that their education is so advanced and adjusts to their needs. We should have more educational programs like that in all countries. Thank you, Norah, for sharing this wonderful post and author with us. 🤗 to you both

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Thank you, Janice. I am glad you enjoyed reading about my schooling and schooling in South Africa in general. Education is so important and is becoming more and more so as we plunge into the fourth industrial revolution of automation.

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  12. olganm

    It’s great to learn more about Robbie. Although she shares memories in her blog, I hadn’t read much about her school experience and it’s an eye-opener. She does very good job, and I hope the situation improves there. Education is so important! Thanks for sharing this fabulous guest post.

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Education is vital, Olga. I must admit that I was not a huge school fan. I preferred to spend my time reading and writing when I was a girl as well as climbing on roofs and making shell people or painting. I liked sewing and knitting and moulding dolls out of plaster of paris. I am hyperactive and sitting still for long periods is hard for me. I also got bored very quickly, I still do. I explained to my colleagues the other day that I needed something very intellectually challenging to do at work as being busy and being inspired is not the same thing at all. Maybe that is why I don’t mention school an awful lot as I preferred by free time.

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  13. CarolCooks2

    A wonderful walk down memory lane, Robbie, lovely to read about your experiences I can relate to silent insubordination as well…I should have an honours degree in that…haha…Latin as a language I loved though but still remember the little ditty some of my classmates used to sing…A delightful interview 🙂 x

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Thanks for reading, Carol. It is amazing how we remember songs and cheeky verses from our youths. I can remember the names and faces of most of the people I matriculated with. I am good at that. I always recognise people before they recognise me. I am glad we share a common characteristic too [wink]

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  14. Susan Scott

    It is great to read a little more about you Robbie and you and your boys education! Wow, I thought I held the record for all the moving and many schools in the process. You say you adjusted to it – I always thought that for me it was adapt or die. I had to laugh about the silent insubordination. I always battled with Afrikaans learning it only as a teenager, but now I find it a lovely and very expressive language and I often intersperse conversation with Afrikaans phrases.
    More grease to your elbow and keep up the good work. Thank you both – much enjoyed 🙂

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Thank you, Susan. I no longer have an aversion to Afrikaans and studied with Greg until Grade 7 when it got a bit beyond me. I am writing a novella on the Anglo Boer War from the perspective of the Burghers. It is fascinating.

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    2. Norah Post author

      Thanks for reading and adding your South African experience to the discourse, Susan. I’m sure you and Robbie would be able to compare lots of notes.

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  15. Marsha Ingrao

    Fabulous interview. Kudos to both of you for putting this bit of history into print. You have made a wonderful community for yourself online. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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  16. Book Club Mom

    Another great interview, Norah and nice to see Robbie here. I love the term “silent insubordination.” Robbie, all those changes growing up and attending many schools has made you very resilient. As for today, schools everywhere need good teachers, the ones who can reach and motivate kids. Looking forward to the next interview!

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Thanks for visiting me here, Barbara. I think it did make me adaptable and resilient. I am not that good at maintaining physical friendships though. I do keep up with many people from the past on line though. You are right about teachers. I taught Sunday School for many years and loved it until I took the teenage group. I found it very difficult to engage them and interest them even when I worked hard to prepare the lessons. It was discouraging and I eventually stopped.

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          1. Book Club Mom

            Oh, sorry, I must not have seen it. My email has been a little crazy the past 2 weeks. Thanks for following up – I just saw the new email and will be happy to do the interview! Hope you’re having a great day! 🙂

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  17. Smorgasbord - Variety is the Spice of Life.

    Terrific Robbie and you certainly were focused on your education in a wonderful way. I must say the public school that I went to in Capetown was very understanding of my lack of Afrikaans and laid on extra tuition until I could catch up. Your son’s school and its outreach programme sound amazing.. thanks Norah…hugs

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      That is probably because you were non-resident, Sally. Although my mom and I came out to SA after my biological father died, my real father is South African. He has strong Afrikaans blood being of the Wapenaar bloodline. I think my teachers thought I should speak Afrikaans, not knowing my history. My son is most fortunate, his school is amazing. So is Mike’s.

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  18. robbiesinspiration

    Reblogged this on Robbie's inspiration and commented:
    I am over at Norah Colvin’s lovely blog with a post about my school days growing up in South Africa. Norah shares wonderful posts with lots of insight into bringing out the best in children and helping them take delight in learning and reading. Do pop over and have a look around.

    Liked by 2 people

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  19. Jules

    Robbie and Norah,

    One of the things that struck me the most in this interview was “silent insubordination.” – I moved around quite a bit too. And kept a distance perhaps sometimes not so much by choice, but for survival. I too feel somewhat closer to blog friends since I seem to have more in common with them than the ‘Locals’ – though my social skills have improved and while my own children where younger I was perhaps overly involved with them and the organizations they belonged to. I was a Scout leader, involved with our congregation both for ‘politically’ and for pleasure. I was in a volunteer choir (two places) for close to 17 years.

    Now I relish my time for me in creating words. Continued success in all you both do. Thanks for a great interview Norah. And Robbie I too remember Sir Chocolate!

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Thanks for reading and commenting, Jules. Moving around makes you good at adjusting, I think. I didn’t want my boys to have to move schools but circumstances had it that they both did move at least once. Michael, particularly, has been to a few schools because of his learning barrier. They are both happy now though. How lovely that you were involved in scouts and the choir. I didn’t know they had lady scout leaders. I never did brownies or girl guides as the meetings were quite far away for us.

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      1. Jules

        The younger boys had Cub Scouts and the Den Leaders were usually some child’s parent. Actually way before the all inclusive switch The Boy Scouts or now just Scouts had co-ed groups for boys and girls – my one son belonged to a medical /first aid type group.

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  20. Jennie

    Delightful interview, Norah! I thorough enjoyed reading about Robbie’s schooling. I do have one question, Robbie. What is outcomes-based education? Your sons’ school sounds wonderful. Also, the effect of a teacher’s negative words have a lasting effect – which is why you hate Afrikaans. Fortunately the reverse, positive words, also have a lasting effect. Thank you both for this interview.

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Hi Jennie, thank you for reading. Outcomes based education is when they test the understanding i.e. outcome of the learning. So instead of Greg having to write a history essay which sets out the facts and dates of an event, he is asked to write an opinion piece that tests his understanding and interpretation of the facts. I used to get exam results in the 90%s for history because I learned the facts off by heart. I much prefer the outcomes based testing, gives you higher thinking skills.

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        1. robbiesinspiration

          Doesn’t it come from Australia, Norah. I thought it was implemented quite successfully in Australia. I love the learning I see happening. You may have to work a bit harder for the outcome but it is really worth it from a growth perspective.

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          1. Norah Post author

            It was implemented in Australia at one stage, Robbie but, like many other things, it was an import and didn’t last long. 🙂 That’s why I was delighted to hear you speak so positively about it.

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  21. dgkaye

    Fantastic interview Robbie. I enjoyed learning about the culture and education in your part of the world. And I had to take a pause at that incident where a teacher embarrassed you. Teachers should never have been doing those things and damaging young self-esteems. I’m glad to see you overcame 🙂 x

    Liked by 2 people

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  22. TanGental

    14 schools? Blimey! I’d have been dizzy for weeks. Yep, reading about your a**hole Afrikaans teacher brings back memories of Latin and my loathing of it for similar reasons. If only they’d understood the damage, but I guess they were probably damaged themselves in some way. And the seething silent insubordination – oh yes, indeedy, I too sent out those vibes, not that it did me any more good than the snarky-narky comments I let loose now I’m older and less careful about holding back!! Sounds like the younger Cheadles are getting a grand education and like you we can hope our respective governments keep working at improving opportunities for all students. More power to your elbow for getting involved in helping the under-privileged.

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Thank you, Geoff. Funny how your experience was also with a language teacher. I think languages are difficult to learn, and it doesn’t help when you are turned off it for life. My boys are lucky, they have a great time at school although there is a lot of pressure now. Much more than when I was at school. Have a great week, Geoff.

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  23. thecontentedcrafter

    Wow Robbie you worked long and hard to achieve your qualifications and I admire when people also conduct their own learning programmes too. It shows an inherent desire to learn that is so valuable in our lives. As I know nothing about education in SA your interview is a most interesting read also. I like the sound of the work your son’s school is doing – that is really worthwhile and will hopefully raise awareness among the students of the needs of others less privileged. I am always heartened by the unsung work and programmes that happen outside the mainstream and it seems you are tapping into that in your corner of the globe. I am grateful you are there!

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    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for your lovely comment, Pauline. I love how each reader finds something different in the reminiscences to comment on. It helps to spread the focus. It is wonderful that Robbie feels her sons’ educational experiences are positive. We need all to feel that way.

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    2. robbiesinspiration

      Thank you for your lovely comment. There are a lot of people in South Africa who give a lot of their time to helping children from under privileged backgrounds with their reading and learning. We are starting a new programme at work where staff and their children will go to schools once a month and read with the children. It is quite rewarding.

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  24. tidalscribe

    What an interesting post. There can be no career as important as being a teacher. All children are different, even in the same family; but governments and society should strive to nurture every future citizen.

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Thank you, Janet. You are right about the importance of teachers. Luckily, my sons have had amazing teachers and we have all been very happy. Michael, especially, has had marvelous support from his teachers and is now coping really well with his work. Ready to mainstream next year for high school. Michael’s grade 1 teacher identified his learning barrier. I thought she was a wonderful woman. I arranged with the art teacher to bring a Christmas tree and a whole lot of decorations and gifts and the children made additional ones in their art classes and put the whole thing together and that was her gift that year. She was so pleased with it.

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  25. OIKOS™-Publishing

    Wow! What a bio. Now i know where a lot of things in Robbie’s book originate from. What experiences. Thank you for sharing, Norah! Sorry, just saw wp.com had unfollowed your blog for me. ;-( Sometimes i think this system has too much own life. 😉 Best wishes, Michael

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    1. Norah Post author

      Robbie did get to experience a lot from all her moves. What an education!
      WP does seem to have a mind of its own at time. Thanks for reading and commenting, Michael.

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  26. Annette Rochelle Aben

    Well now, this was a breath of fresh air in my day. I used to wonder what went through the heads of others around me, when I was in school. So, I simply imagined that Robbie was one of those of whom I was curious and I got more than I bargained for ( in the best sense of the words ). Cheers!!

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  27. D. Avery @shiftnshake

    What a story! This peek into your past puts your present into perspective. I am glad for you that you think well of your sons’ schools and I liked especially the idea of “outcomes-based” programs. So many students (I was one) even if we enjoy school and do okay there, still see it as that place we go everyday for twelve years instead of using the opportunities to better advantage and working harder to get what we want and need while there. You have reminded me to do more goal setting and check-ins with my students.
    Robbie, thanks for sharing!

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      I am glad you enjoyed my little walk down memory lane. It was interesting for me to reflect back on my school days. I went to a few intimidating schools where the teachers scared me to death. My Afrikaans teacher used to bang my elbow on the desk or hit my hand with a ruler. No wonder I didn’t like the subject.

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      1. Norah Post author

        Not liking Afrikaans when the teacher treats you like that is understandable Robbie, but the teacher’s behaviour isn’t. Fortunately the days of corporal punishment in schools is over.

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        1. robbiesinspiration

          I am so glad there is no corporal punishment now, Norah. Gregory would be a nervous wreck and so would I. The boys used to get six of the best when I was at school and the girls were hit with a ruler on their hands.

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    2. Norah Post author

      Thanks for your thoughtful response, D. I love that these posts rekindle our own memories and sometimes encourage us to make adjustments in the future.

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      I am sure there are a few of us that didn’t always agree with our teachers. I went to school at a time when children were not encouraged to have opinions and sometimes our teachers were wrong. I have more understanding now that I am an adult of how difficult retaining control of a class of teenagers is.

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  28. Darlene

    This is a delightful memory by Robbie. I loved, “Generally speaking, Robbie is generally speaking.” Having a gift of the gab though is valuable in adult life. My teachers often commented on the fact that I chatted a lot too. You are fortunate in that you are a numbers person and a letters person. A great balance. Good to read about education in South Africa.

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    1. Norah Post author

      ‘Generally speaking’ is a great one, I agree. I wish I thought to use it for some of my students. 🙂
      I’m pleased you’re enjoying the interviews, Darlene. Thanks for reading and commenting.

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  29. calmkate

    Really nice to know more about Robbie … I got a school award for reading eleven books a week, the record but Robbie read 14 a week … what an achievement!

    All the shifting must have been hard, and silent insubordination … 😉

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Thanks Kate, I don’t think my insubordination is silent any more, I am quite vocal when I don’t agree with something. We didn’t have a TV when I was young and mom was busy with my little sisters. There was nothing else to do but read.

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  30. joylennick

    Thank you, Norah. And Robbie! So many schools to cope with, but you acquitted yourself very well and are to be congratulated. You come across as one talented cookie, and I enjoyed reading your reminiscences. xx

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    1. robbiesinspiration

      Thank you, Joy, you do say nice things. I was a very busy child and I am now a very busy adult. Some things never change. I always laugh and say that when Terence married me, he knew he was getting an obsessive compulsive person, the obsessions change but the compulsions do not.

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    1. Norah Post author

      I’m pleased you enjoyed Robbie’s reminiscences, Ritu, and I’m pleased you mentioned the b d thing as I meant to, and forgot. My son Robert also spelt his name Rodert until he was about eight. It didn’t impede his learning at all either. He now has a PhD. 🙂

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            1. robbiesinspiration

              That is interesting, Ritu. I have found that many parents resist acknowledging any sort of learning barrier in their children. So many kids don’t get the help they need because their parents won’t allow them to receive it. Moving Michael to a remedial school was the best decision I ever made.

              Liked by 1 person

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              1. Ritu

                There are ones, but those tend to be parents of children who haven’t had the best examples in life..
                And a label would excuse their behaviour, if you get what I mean!

                Liked by 1 person

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                1. Norah Post author

                  It’s a balance between giving a child time or giving a child a label. If a label means appropriate support, then that’s great.

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        1. robbiesinspiration

          Greg inverted entire words when he first learned to write. He would write his whole name as a mirror inversion. It hasn’t done him any harm either. He is a very determined boy. Exams are in two weeks and he is sitting here near me making history notes and mind maps.

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