what do you love a post about a love of literacy

What do you love?

We use the word ‘love’ to mean care deeply about, as in people, or like a lot, as in food, objects and activities. Questions such as “Who do you love?” and “What do you love?” will elicit very different responses and we generally have little difficulty in distinguishing between the intensity of the feelings. Mostly the whos are more important to us than the whats, and it is easy to distinguish between the likes and the loves, though they can sit along a continuum.

love of vegetables on a continuum

For me, housework sits at the opposite end of the continuum from reading and writing. You won’t find me writing any posts about housework. But you will find lots of posts about reading and writing, especially encouraging a love of reading and writing in children. I find sharing a love of reading and writing to be almost equal in enjoyment as reading and writing for myself. To see children light up with enthusiasm for reading and writing is sheer joy.

the love of reading is one of the greatest gifts a parent can give a child

I have often said that one of the greatest gifts a parent can give a child is a love of reading. A love of reading and writing, and indeed for all learning, is the best gift a teacher can give.

the love of reading and writing is contagious

It is often said that a love of reading is caught, not taught. The same goes for writing. It is important for teachers to ensure that there is time every day to read aloud to children, to inspire them and excite their imaginations with wonderful literature and to provide them with time for expressing their own thoughts and imaginative ideas through writing and any other of the expressive arts.

I have written many blog posts, both here and for readilearn, with suggestions for making time for literature and literacy, but it was the prompt set by Charli Mills at the Carrot Ranch that kept me thinking that way this week.

Carrot Ranch flash fiction challenge Valentines

You see, Charli challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about valentines. It can be Valentine’s Day, the exchange, love for another, romance, or friendship. Have a heart and go where the prompt leads!

But, as well as being Valentine’s Day, 14 February is also Library Lovers’ Day and International Book Giving Day.

Why wouldn’t I write about one of my loves — reading and writing? I hope you enjoy it.

Just for the love of it

The teacher closed the book, but the children were abuzz.

“Keep going,” they urged.

“Will they be alright?”

“What will happen?”

The teacher looked at the clock. The minutes had passed like seconds. Was there time?

“Pleeeease!”

The teacher opened the book.

“Yay!” cheered the children, then hushed as the words flowed.

As the story unfolded, their eyes lit up and imaginations sparked. They discussed the story’s intricacies and contemplated outcomes as they journeyed with the author through good and fearsome times. Finally, just as the dragon was about to swoop, the teacher stopped. “Now write! What happens next?”

 

reading is a super power

Here are links to just five of the posts I’ve written about reading and writing:

A sprinkle of this, a pinch of that, and Poof! It’s reading — magic!

Wrapping up a year of books — the gift of reading

I love poems

Reading is all it’s cracked up to be: 10 tips for an early childhood classroom!

Writing poetry with children

And two more about libraries:

Libraries: A wondrous universe to explore — a guest post by Dimity Powell

Libraries, books and reading = infinite worlds to explore

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

59 thoughts on “What do you love?

  1. Mabel Kwong

    ‘It is often said that a love of reading is caught, not taught’ This sentence caught my eye, Norah. So agree. Reading, and learning, can’t be forced but something that one picks up over time. If there is something we prefer reading, I think we’ll be more inclined to read and hence learn. When I was younger, I read fiction and that was all I read. Wasn’t interested in reading non-fiction at all. Then one day, I got bored of reading fiction and decided to read non-fiction and that’s what I prefer to read these days 😀 Lovely piece at the end and great buildup. A great way to encourage kids to write – make them excited about writing 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks so much for reading and sharing your thoughts, Mabel. I read a lot of non-fiction too, but it is mainly education, science or memoir.
      I’m pleased you enjoyed the flash. I love writing with young children, and with young children in mind.

      Like

      Reply
  2. Hugh's Views and News

    I have to say that some of my best short story ideas have come while doing housework, Norah. The ironing board, especially, seems to inspire me sometimes.
    And what a great way to end a piece of flash fiction. Being read too, and now using writing to continue the story. Just think about all those different versions about to unfold.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I’m pleased that housework and ironing work for you, Hugh. It’s good to have these down times when we allow the imagination to wander and creative ideas to enter.
      I always loved all the different versions of stories that would be written in the class. I guess it’s not unlike all the different responses to Charli’s prompts. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. Jules

    I’m there with you on housework… one of my least favorite tasks. But as you know I could read and have helped my Grands write their own books. I think it is a wonderful thing to ask children to make up their own conclusions – some of those stories might tell you something about the child you might not have known. Happy, sad or even violent endings. Always a good place to start asking questions about why they choose the words they do. And a teacher in tune with her students is a true gem.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts, Jules, full of wisdom as usual. It is true that we get to know children, and each other, better when we ask questions and engage in conversations.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  4. Camie

    I have never forgotten the image of a teacher reading Bridge to Terabithia to my class. It was my favorite part of the school day. As a parent I have read many classics with my children and that has been so rewarding. Great prompt and writing!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Camie, I am delighted to hear of your experience, listening to the teacher reading “Bridge to Terabithia”. What a wonderful acknowledgement of the value of read alouds in school (and at home) and a nod of thanks to the teacher. I’m pleased to hear you are growing another generation of avid lifelong readers. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. Steven

    I’d love to have that cupcake. I’m not much of a reader, but the end of your fiction with the unknown situation of the dragon, reminded me of another book also involving a dragon at the end.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36027243-the-writing-in-the-stone

    I thought it was a fascinating and easy read with lovely typesetting, images and layout, but also not for the faint hearted with some particularly dark and gruesome scenes, which I would imagine are meant to reflect some aspect of terrible humanity in an ancient society. The teacher in your fiction definitely isn’t reading out that story.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I agree. The cupcake looks pretty good, doesn’t it?
      I’m pleased that my flash made you think of another story you had enjoyed. I don’t think “The Writing in the Stone” is for me. I am rather faint-hearted when it comes to dark and gruesome. The teacher in my story definitely wouldn’t be reading from that story. Maybe to an older class, though?
      Thanks for popping by, Steven. I was thinking about you lately, noticing that we’d not had a conversation for a while. I hope you are doing well and enjoying 2019. Best wishes to you and your family.

      Like

      Reply
      1. Steven

        Erm, maybe to an adult class, unless that teacher skipped a paragraph here and there. Thanks for your kind words and my thoughts are likewise. Life gets busy and although I haven’t been able to read or respond to your posts, it is good to see that you’ve got a community that appreciates and enjoys them.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. Norah Post author

          Thank you, Steven. I appreciate that you call in and comment when you can. You always have interesting thoughts to share. There is never any expectation, simply appreciation when it occurs. Have a great week!

          Like

          Reply
  6. Miriam Hurdle

    I can’t agree with you more, Norah. My granddaughter loves to read. She learned many words already. She picks her favorite books and asks mom or dad or me or my husband to read and she helps turn the pages. Sometimes my daughter found her sitting in the rocking chair in her bedroom reading. It’s amazing that she does that as a 15 months old. When I saw the photos my daughter posted, I almost cried.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      How absolutely gorgeous, Miriam – a lifelong reader in the making. My children would ‘read’ to themselves, and their toys, at that age too. I understand how you almost cried – tears of immeasurable joy.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
                    1. Norah Post author

                      I think it’s wonderful that you did that for parents, Miriam. I did too. I ran classes for children of before school age and their parents. I organised activities on a theme for the children to do with their parents, explained to the parents the benefits of the activities and gave them ideas to do at home. Even now that their children are in their 30s, they tell me what a difference the classes made to their children’s lives. And now some of those children are parents and passing the learning on. It couldn’t make me happier. I feel all warm and fuzzy inside to know that I have made a positive difference to other lives. I’m happy knowing that we share in this though we are miles apart.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    2. Miriam Hurdle

                      I know exactly how it feels, Norah. I had two parents volunteered full time when I taught kindergarten. They observed what I did with the kids in class and did the same things at home. When I thanked them for helping, They thanked me for showing them what to do with their kids. They requested to have their kids in my class when I moved to upper grades and when their kids entered those grades.

                      Liked by 1 person

  7. Charli Mills

    Housework sits low on my continuum, too, Norah! But sometimes I blitz-clean in order to process a writing idea in my head, or my SIL listens to podcasts as he cleans. A bit literary! I love the idea that “…a love of reading is caught, not taught.” An infectious teacher is required, as you describe in your flash. The story she is reading reminds me of the Dragon story you wrote at readilearn.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      A blitz-clean sound interesting. Not. I’ll put that on my list of things to remember never to do! 🙂 I am pleased it works for you though. I think listening to podcasts or audiobooks at the same time is a great idea. I would need headphones to hear over the vacuum. Now there’s an idea. 🙂
      I’m pleased the dragon got you thinking of Dragona. It’s good to make connections with ‘prior learning’. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.