libraries books reading, importance of school libraries

readilearn: Libraries, books and reading = infinite worlds to explore

What is your fondest memory of a library?

Books, books, and more books. More books than I could ever read.

Books to inform, books to entertain, books to amuse, books to escape the everyday world.

Libraries, books and reading

As a child, I borrowed from the school library and the public library. I remember walking the 3.7 kilometres (2 ยผ miles in those pre-metricย days of my childhood) to the public library most Saturdays and coming home with an armload of books.

As a parent, I read to and with my children many times a day โ€”morning, afternoon and evening. Books were always given as gifts, and we had shelves filled with books we owned, but these were always supplemented with books borrowed from the library. We could never have too many books.

As a teacher, I shared my love of reading with the students, making the most of every opportunity to read to them, regardless of whether it be reading time, maths time, science time or whatever time.

Many of the children I taught had not had early opportunities to fall in love with books. I believed (believe) it is imperative to foster a love of reading and learning to empower children, soon-to-be-adults, in making their own educated and informed life choices. The families of many of these children could not afford to purchase books, but with access to school and public libraries, there was never a reason for them to be without books to read.

Nowadays, libraries are not just books, and the old library cards have been replaced with digital catalogues and borrowing systems. Not only is there more to know, but there are also more ways for information to be stored and shared, and more ways to learn.

The role of teacher librarians

 

Continue reading: readilearn: Libraries, books and reading = infinite worlds to explore

21 thoughts on “readilearn: Libraries, books and reading = infinite worlds to explore

  1. roughwighting

    The local library saved my life. Pure and simple. I had a wonderful childhood, but without books and the safe secure library to discover them, read them, be challenged by them, my life would have been (and would be) horrendously small and narrow, meek and boring.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. Jules

    I love libraries! I get tons of books at the Cafe store at my library. Some hard cover books go for 1 – 3$. Most new hard covers can be up to 15 – 20$. I picked up some unique journal type books for my Grands this year – in what I think are author/subjects that will also encourage their imaginations for writing.

    Some libraries you can rent art. And of course video and audio books. I volunteered for a small branch library years ago. I’m not sure I like the computerized system. It isn’t quite the same as card catalogs.

    Many libraries also offer sanctuary from the heat or cold. I’m glad that on a good day (weather permitting) I can walk to my library. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      I knew you’d love and make good use of libraries, Jules. It’s good to take advantage of sales of their old stock. Your grands are benefiting too.
      I haven’t ever rented art from a library. I’m not sure if we can do that here. I have fond memories of the old library cards, but I think the computerised system must ease the management load. But it probably also increases it in other ways as it has seemed to do in other fields (e.g. teaching).
      I think the sanctuary aspect of libraries is an important one.
      You are fortunate to be able to walk to your local library.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. Jennie

    Wonderful post, Norah. Thank you! I was never read to as a child, with the exception of my grandmother, on a rare occasion. I only went to a library one time as a child. I think that makes my reading aloud all the more important!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thank you, Jennie. I’m sorry you were never read to as a child. I have no memories of being read to either but I not sure if that means I don’t remember, or it didn’t happen. Fortunately for us and hundreds of children, we discovered the joy in books and have continued to share it with our children, both biological and heart.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  4. Jacqui Murray

    I love libraries. When my daughter was accepted into Notre Dame’s summer science program, I went with her–and spent the week in their library! Oh what joy that was. And then there’s the day spent at the Library of Congress. These are some very fond memories.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Those library sound magnificent. I have wonderful memories of meeting up with three blogging friends at the British Library when I visited London four years ago, almost (but not quite) to the day. ๐Ÿ™‚ At least two of those friends weren’t published at the time but now are, with multiple books. Shows what a few years can do, eh Geoff Le Pard and Anne Goodwin?

      Like

      Reply
  5. Annecdotist

    Great post, Norah. I didnโ€™t see any mention of Libraries Week โ€“ apologies if I missed it โ€“ or perhaps thatโ€™s just in the UK?
    I actually donโ€™t remember any libraries at school, just bookshelves in the classrooms, but I did make good use of our town Carnegie library as a child. But my fondest memory is actually at university borrowing novels from the English section after the exams were over (I wasnโ€™t studying English). I was staggered at the choice โ€“ and staggered home with armfuls of books.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks, Anne. I’m not sure that this is libraries week. The organisation “Students need school libraries” is launching over here on Tuesday. Every week should be libraries week though. ๐Ÿ™‚
      I like your use of both meanings of ‘staggered’, Anne. Well done. There are so many books, I don’t know how anyone could read them all. But we try. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

      Reply
  6. Patricia Tilton

    Enjoyed your post. I loved libraries as a child. I remember snowy Saturday mornings going to listen to story time. But, I loved the bookmobiles visiting my neighborhood in the summer the most. I am amazed at how high tech libraries are today as I see a lot of kids on computers and engaged in groups. I love that public libraries offer tutoring. So very different.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. Norah Post author

      Thanks so much for adding your experiences, Patricia, so different from mine. I’ve never been to a library on a snowy day and I’ve never visited a bookmobile. However, I am amazed at how high tech modern libraries are. They are really community hubs now with all the different programs they offer.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.