Monthly Archives: June 2018

women warrriors

Warrior Woman

This week at the Carrot Ranch Charli Mills has challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about warrior women. It can be myth or everyday mothers and wives. Go where the prompt leads.

Warrior Women flash fiction challenge from the Carrot Ranch

A warrior is defined as a brave and experienced fighter, a soldier perhaps. While most of us will never be called upon to face the enemy on a battlefield, many will struggle to overcome obstacles of different kinds in their personal lives.

From a young age, children must be encouraged to find their inner strength, to overcome challenges large and small, to be resilient when faced with setbacks, to be confident to try again and to persist even when the going gets tough.

This is as true for boys as it is for girls, but sometimes it feels easier to encourage boys to be adventurous and girls to be sweet and demure. That this is changing is a good thing.

In response to Charli’s prompt, I looked for a warrior a little closer to home. I hope you like it.

Gertrude the Invincible

With flaming hair streaming and eyes blazing, Gertrude stood at the apex surveying the land, her land.  With one hand on a hip and the other raised high, she hurled her words into the wind.

I did it. I am the conqueror. You,” she pointed expansively with her spear, “are now my subjects. You do my bidding.”

The minions bowed before her.

“I am in-vinc-i-ble!”

“Gertie! Pick up your toys and come inside now. It’s dinner-time,” called Dad from the door.

Gertie complied. Even warriors need to eat. There’d be more conquests and enemies for Gertrude to vanquish tomorrow.

Note: Gertrude is a German name meaning spear and strength. As long as she is encouraged, I think this Gertrude will have little difficulty living up to her name (minus the spear).

Thank you blog post

Thank you for reading. I appreciate your feedback. Please share your thoughts.

Emma Middleton author and illustrator discusses the importance of illustrations in children's picture books

The importance of illustrations in picture books – a guest post by Emma Middleton – Readilearn

This week I have great pleasure in introducing you to Emma Middleton who is here to discuss illustrations in picture books as tools for analysis, enjoyment and interpretation.

Emma is a picture book author, illustrator, children’s performer and former ballerina who lives near Noosa, Queensland. After a career in performing arts, during which time she danced for the Vienna Ballet, she returned to Australia to direct and teach at The Brighton Dance Academy.

Emma retired from teaching dance to follow her passion for picture books by creating stories that will enhance a child’s sense of wonder, delight and unlimited possibility. Emma is the author of companion picture books The Lion in our Living Room and The Bear in our Backyard.

Welcome to readilearn, Emma. Over to you.

Illustrations in picture books can be an excellent tool for developing children’s analytical and interpretative skills, as well as enhancing their enjoyment of art. Picture book advocate Megan Daley says, ‘Picture books are works of art which should adorn the walls of art galleries and libraries.’

For young children, illustrated books open the door to understanding story. Illustrations provide young readers with an immediate vision of the characters, setting, and mood of the story. Children instantly respond to characters from their visual appeal. We all know and love many picture book characters from their image alone.

Emma Middleton discusses the importance of illustrations in children's picture books, including Peter Rabbit

 

Continue reading: The importance of illustrations in picture books – a guest post by Emma Middleton – Readilearn